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JANUARY, 1963 


501* 



Magazine Of Motion Picture 


Photography And 


Production Techniques 



PHOTOGRAPHING A WALT DISNEY PRODUCTION 






There are a lot of reasons for spending three days at the 
Seventeenth Calvin Motion Picture Workshop. Those most 
often mentioned are: exchange ideas, find out what’s new, re¬ 
view fundamentals, see how the other people do it, get help 
on a special problem, compare techniques, and just for fun. 
Five hundred will be expected. 

Let us know if you will be one of them... 


. TO: 

Calvin Productions, Inc. 
i 1105 Truman Road 
1 Kansas City 6, Missouri 

I Please reserve space for: 

L_ 



CALVIN PRODUCTIONS, INC., 


1105 TRUMAN ROAD, 


KANSAS CITY 6, MISSOURI 

































Z O Oilf/ 

12mm to 120mm 

WITH THE NEW ANGENIEUX ZOOM LENS 
Now Available From GORDON ENTERPRISES For Immediate Delivery 

The dramatic focal length range of the new An- 
genieux Model 1 20 is of outstanding importance to 
anyone operating a 16mm motion picture camera or 
TV camera. Superb optics, small size, light weight 
and the finest craftsmanship have provided a lens 
of unparalleled utility and perfection. 

The zoom range, from 12mm to 120mm, without 
image shift, is double that of any lens previously 
available, at any price. Another outstanding feature 
is the small hand-crank which operates the gear- 
driven zoom movement. This gives the cameraman 
precisely controlled, exceptionally smooth zooms. A 
Conventional lever is also provided for fast zooms. 

The Angenieux Model 120 is available in mount for 
the Arriflex, and in C-mount for videcon and other 
reflex-type cameras. 


Aperture: 

f/2.2 to f/22. (T/2.5 to 

T/22). 

Focus Range: 

Five feet to infinity. 

Zoom Range: 

1 2mm to 1 20mm. 

Field Angles: 

56° to 6°. 

Dimensions: 

5 3 U" ext. from turret. Largest 
diameter less than 3". 

Weight: 

1 pound-1 4 ounces. 

Supplied With . . . 

End caps and 2-piece adapt¬ 
er to retain Series 9 filters. 
(Also serves as shallow sun¬ 
shade ). 

Price: 

$820.00 

Delivery: 

IMMEDIATE! 





AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


3 










CAMART DUAL SOUND 
EDITOR MODEL SB 111 


Edit single- and double-system optical sound. 
Edit single-system Magnastripe or double sys¬ 
tem magnetic sound. Use with any 16mm 
motion picture viewer. (Works from left to 


right or right to left.) 

Dual Editor (without viewer) $195 00 

Zeiss Moviscop viewer 96.00 

Special Editor-viewer combination $269.50 


CAMART 

CORE 

DISPENSER 


Keeps fi lm cores 
handy at all times. 
Easy to remove—easy 
to fill. All aluminum 
construction. Adjust¬ 
able to 16mm and 
35mm cores. 

Sizes 

i6" $10.00 


24". 12.00 

36" . 16.00 

Aluminum Dispenser for Plastic Reels 

so— 16.50 loo— 18.50 


NEW! GTC-59 


Makes Glass 
Smoother Than 
Glass GTC-59 
Glass Treatment 
Compound • Wa¬ 
ter repellent • 
Anti-Static • Anti- 
Fog • Cleans & 
degreases • 
Leaves a lustrous 
glaze • Excellent 
for glass, chrome, 
plastics, etc. 6 
oz. with Spray 
Applicator. 


$1.65 

Prices F O B. N.Y. 


AMERICAN 

Cinematographer 

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOTION PICTURE 
PHOTOGRAPHY AND PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES 


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JANUARY, 1963 voi. 44, No i 


FEATURES 

Photographing a Walt Disney Production. 22 

After Photography, What?. 24 

Filming In Asia For American TV. 26 

Zoom Lens Technique. 28 

Fitting The Camera To The Job. 32 

Planning—Key To Better, More Profitable Films. 34 

A.S.C. Recommendation No. 11. 35 

The Mitchell Mark II Reflex. 36 


DEPARTMENTS 

Industry News. 6 

What’s New In Equipment, Accessories, Services.. 10 

Technical Questions & Answers. 14 

Behind The Cameras. 20 

A.S.C. Roster for January 1, 1963. 38 


ON THE COVER 

CAMERA REHEARSAL—Edward Colman's camera crew makes dry run with dolly- 
mounted camera preparatory to making moving camera shot for Walt Disney's 
"Savage Sam," starring Brian Keith. Note that powerful Brute used for booster 
light has a stack to carry fumes and heat out of range of crew and cast; the unique 
snoot and housing encasing the microphone on boom (center); and the assistant 
cameraman running a tape on Keith as camera rolls back with the moving horsemen. 


ARTHUR E. GAVIN, Editor 

MARION HUTCHINS, Editorial Assistant 

OFFICES—Editorial and Business: 1782 No. Orange Drive, Hollywood 28, Calif. Telephone 
HOIlywood 7-2135. EASTERN ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE: Paul Gilbert, 489 Fifth Avenue, 
New York 17, N.Y. Telephone AX 1-5641. 


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AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, established 1920, is published monthly by the A. S. C. Agency, 
Inc., 1782 N. Orange Dr., Hollywood 28, Calif. SUBSCRIPTIONS: United States and Canada, $5.00 
per year; Foreign, including Pan-American Union, $6.00 per year. Single copies 50 cents; back 
numbers 60 cents; foreign single copies, 60 cents; back numbers, 70 cents. Advertising rates on 
application. Copyright 1963 by A. S. C. Agency, Inc. Second-class postage paid at Los Angeles, 
California. 


4 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 



































ARRIFLEX at work — one of a series* 




ARRIFLEX goes hunting 


with the Missouri 


Conservation Commission 


Filming a hawk’s swift plunge calls 
for sharp follow-focus and accurate 
centering of the viewfinder image. 
That’s one reason biologist Charles W. 
Schwartz uses an Arriflex, in his 
motion picture studies of birds and 
animals for the Missouri Con¬ 
servation Commission. The finder 
image is formed by the taking 
lens itself ... parallax-free, 


framed and focused exactly the way it’s 
being filmed. Another reason ... wide- 
angles and telephotos can be mounted 
side-by-side on the Arriflex turret, 
which diverges lens axes a full 21° to 
eliminate optical and mechanical inter¬ 
ference. Arriflex ... extremely 
mobile,- fast-handling, and 
precise ... best in the field! 



From the microscope to the missile range... from spot locations 
to sound stages... Arriflex professional motion picture cameras 
are the dominant choice of filmmakers in science, industry, and 
entertainment. They’re lightweight, rugged, tremendously versa¬ 
tile - uniquely suited to a range of applications virtually without 
limits. Here are some of the features that give Arriflex cameras 
their remarkable capabilities: 

• MIRROR-SHUTTER REFLEX VIEWFINDER • REGISTRATION- 
PIN FILM MOVEMENT • 21°-DIVERGENCE 3-LENS TURRET • 
CONTOUR HAND GRIP • FRAMES-PER-SECOND TACHOMETER 

• COMPLETE ACCESSORY SYSTEM . . . lenses, standard and 
special-purpose electric drives, power supplies, time-lapse equip¬ 
ment, film magazines, sound blimps, tripods. 



write for new catalog. *YOU ARE INVITED to send us a description of your special use of Arriflex equipment. 



AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 










CAMART OIL PEN 


New ECCO Improved 
Model D For 
16mm & 35mm 


Clean and inspect your film in one easy 
operation Operates effectively at several 
hundred feet per minute. Save time, fluid, 
labor, and money. Lifetime bakelite construc¬ 
tion. Elimiates waxing. Absolutely safe and 
NON-TOXIC. NON-INFLAMMABLE. 

Widely used by schools, colleges and film 
libraries. 

Model D Applicator with One Gallon 

Ecco Cleaning Fluid $42.00 

Ecco No. 1500 cleaning fluid, Gallon $9.00 

Ecco No 2000 cleaning fluid for 

NEGATIVES .Gallon $7.00 

ALL FILM HANDLING SUPPLIES 
IN STOCK 

Acetone.per quart $1 .40 

Ethyloid Film Cement.pint $2.00 

Film Handling gloves.per dozen $1 .95 

Galco Filmeter stop watch, Swiss jeweled 
movement. Measures equivalent footage for 
16mm and 35mm film .$24.50 


Lubristyle precision oiler—ideal for oil¬ 
ing hard to get at equipment. PrPess 
point of needle down on spot to be 
oiled and oil will flow freely. Surplus 
oil is sucked back into pen. 

$1.69 ea. 

in quantities of six $1.39 ea. 


Prices F.O.B. 


Cleans — Lubricates — 
Prevents Dust Static 


Speedroll 

Applicator Model D 


INDUSTRY 

NEWS 

News briefs of industry activities , products and progress 


“Oscar” Nominations 
Balloting Begins 

The 35th Annual Awards presenta¬ 
tions of the Academy of Motion Pic¬ 
ture Arts and Sciences of Hollywood 
got under way December 26th, when 
preliminary ballots for nominations 
voting in the cinematography, art di¬ 
rection, costume design, film editing, 
music scoring and best song categories 
were mailed to members of the Acad¬ 
emy. Deadline for preliminary voting 
in the above-named categories is Mon¬ 
day, January 7th. 

On Monday, January 14th, at the 
Academy’s theatre, screening of pic¬ 
tures named in the preliminary ballot¬ 
ing will begin. Nominations ballots for 
the five categories will be mailed to 
Academy members beginning February 
11th. Voting deadline on the nomina¬ 
tions balloting is February 19th. All 
nominations will be announced Mon¬ 
day, February 25th. Final balloting to 
determine the “Oscar” winners begins 
March 15th and closes March 30th. 

The awards presentations will take 
place Monday evening, April 8th, in 
Santa Monica, Calif. 

• 

Calvin Workshop Dates Set 

Calvin Productions, Inc., Kansas 
City, Missouri, has set February 4, 5, 
and 6th as dates for its 17th annual 
Calvin Workshop, which will take place 
on the sound stages and throughout 
the company’s buildings at 1105 Tru¬ 
man Road, Kansas City. 

There is no cost or obligation for 
those attending the workshop. “We 
welcome everyone who is interested or 
active in film and motion picture ac¬ 
tivities,” said Lee Davis, Calvin’s 
Vice-president. Each year the event is 
attended by 400 to 500 persons with 
prime interest in motion picture pro¬ 
duction, cinematography, and indus¬ 
trial film applications. “If it is neces¬ 
sary that you have a personal invita¬ 
tion on our company letterhead,” Davis 
added, “we will be happy to furnish 
same on request.” This should ease the 
way for in-plant men eager to attend 
the conference and soak up some film 


making knowledge, but first must get 
their employer’s consent to a leave of 
absence to attend. 

Tentative program calls for talks, 
demonstrations, etc., on planning the 
film, the script, talent selection, loca¬ 
tion interior and exterior photography 
and studio lighting on Monday, Feb¬ 
ruary 4th. Subjects for following day 
include Sets and Properties, The Di¬ 
rector, 16mm Camera Stocks, Special 
Camera Effects, Common Errors, and 
the Editing Process. 

Workshop will wind up Wednesday 
with the program that includes, Tech¬ 
nical and Character Animation, The 
Storyboard, Background Design, Lab 
Operations, Sound Recording and Re¬ 
cording Equipment. 

• 

Camera Mart Announces 
Film Editing Seminar 

Camera Mart, Inc., 1845 Broadway, 
New York, N.Y., has scheduled its 
first annual Film Editing Workshop- 
Seminar for the week of October 7th 
through October 11, 1963. 

All aspects of film editing will be 
covered during the five-day session 
through technical demonstrations, lec¬ 
tures, practice projects, scene-by-scene 
editorial analysis, and selected film 
showings. 

The Workshop-Seminar will be held 
in the main ballroom of the Henry 
Hudson Hotel in mid-town Manhattan. 
A number of prominent professional 
film editors have agreed to participate 
as instructors, lecturers and guest 
speakers, according to Charles Lipow, 
Camera Mart’s General Manager in 
charge of the Workshop-Seminar. No 
charges or fees of any kind are in¬ 
volved. Attendance is limited to in¬ 
dustrial in-plant, University and gov¬ 
ernment agency film editors and asso¬ 
ciated personnel. 

• 

Film Test Method 
Saves Processing Time 

A new method for standardized 
processing of test strips of black-and- 
white and color negative movie film 
makes it possible to evaluate exposure, 

Continued on Page 8 


6 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 

















PROFESSIONAL 16mm MODEL 



to 

£006 

at 

S.O.S. Ediola M-16 Jr. Action Viewer....$ 99.50 

S.O.S. Ediola M-16 Sr. Action Viewer with pressure 
plate and double pad rollers (left to right) $135.00 

S.O.S. Ediola MRL-16 Sr. Action Viewer with pressure 
plate and double pad rollers (right to left) $195.00 


S.O.S. Ediola Pro-35 for 35mm...$395.00 

Model MA Pro-8 Viewer for 8mm..$ 89.50 


Write for illustrated brochure 



its. PHSTQ-Cltte 


y-y ki 



' -'vM. 






» . ..'.’ r.. 

.. 

-- ■ 


S.O.S. PHOTO-CII-OPTICS, II. 


formerly S.O.S. CINEMA SUPPLY CORP. 

602 West 52nd St., N.Y. 19—Plaza 7-0440—Telegram: “FAX, N.Y.” 
Western Branch: 6331 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. — Phone: 467-2124 

SEE OFFERINGS OF EXTRA-SPECIAL VALUES ON PAGES 10, 12, 14, 18, 53 AND 57 -<-—-* 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


7 
































Newest light in the recently announced Quartz-King line, the 
1000 produces more than 860 foot-candles of smooth even light 

at 10 feet! Utilizing the Sylvania "DXN" 1000-watt 3400°K 
quartz-iodine lamp, in a reflector of a brilliant new design, the 
Quartz-King 1000 produces a round pattern of light, perfectly 
smooth, without hot spots, without banding, and without filament 
pattern. Never before has so much usable light been available 
in a housing as compact and as light as the 1000! 


The Quartz-King 1000 operates directly from standard 110/120 
volt outlets. Intensity is maintained because the quartz-lamp will 
not discolor or dim during its entire life, and the reflector will 
never tarnish. 


The Quartz-King 1000 is available in two basic models; Universal 
Yoke and Integral Mogul Screw Base, with either medium or 
wide flood reflectors. 

WITH UNIVERSAL YOKE 

LQK/10MY Medium Flood 

LQK/10WY Wide Flood 

Specially designed yoke permits mounting on 5 /s" 
dia. lighit stands, horizontal or vertical bars. '/4-20 
thread for tripod mounting. 240" vertical tilt. Adjust¬ 
able for horizontal or vertical lamp orientation. Sup¬ 
plied with 10 ft. 3-wire heavy duty safety-grounded 
cable with in-the-line switch and 3-to-2 prong adapter. 

WITH INTEGRAL MOGUL SCREW BASE 

IQK/10MM Medium Flood 

LQK/10WM Wide Flood 

Allows use of QUARTZ-KING in any lamp or housing 
designed for mogul base lamps. Supplied with 
adapter for medium screw base sockets. 




WRITE FOR 

ILLUSTRATED LITERATURE 


630 S. FLOWER STREET 

BURBANK, CALIF. • VICTORIA 9-5991 


INDUSTRY NEWS 


Continued from Page 6 

lighting effects, and composition of 
motion-picture scenes before beginning 
actual photography. 

A paper by Charles W. Baker and 
Earl W. Kage of Kodak Research La¬ 
boratories, in the December '‘Journal 
of the Society of Motion Picture and 
Television Engineers,' describes the 
technique, which gives results com¬ 
parable to those obtained with large, 
continuous-processing machines. 

Processing equipment consists of a 
hanger for a 12-inch strip of 16mm 
or 35mm film with an attached vane 
agitator. The apparatus is shaped to 
fit the graduated, glass cylinders con¬ 
taining processing solutions. Black- 
and-white film can be viewed wet after 
10 minutes of processing with the 
equipment in standard solutions at 75 
degrees F. 

The hanger permits easy loading of 
film while the, vane agitator makes 
possible an unvarying agitation rate 
from batch to batch, even with dif¬ 
ferent operators. 

Repeatability of the process means 
that the developed film strips will be 
within limits for visually determining 
the results possible with continuous 
film processing machines, the paper 
points out. 

Although there are differences be¬ 
tween strip-processed and machine- 
processed films, enough information is 
available in strip-processed films to 
make them valuable, even when the 
user has a minimum of evaluation ex¬ 
perience. Details not seen in the 
shadow areas of the strip-processed 
negatives probably will not be seen in 
color prints made from the color 
negatives. 

70mm Cinemas Gain In Japan 

There were 55 motion picture thea¬ 
tres in Japan equipped for screening 
70mm films as of June 30th. 1962. 
With seven more theatres currently 
under construction the total is expected 
to reach 70 by mid-January, according 
to Uni Japan Film Quarterly, Japanese 
film industry trade publication. 

Since the introduction of the first 
70mm American film “Oklahoma” in 
1956, the number of 70mm theatres in 
Japan has been rapidly increasing, and 
today ultra-wide-screen films may be 
seen in 32 major cities. 

Continued on Page 52 


8 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 





















Troutoled Toy ont - of -focus paotnres? 

Troubled Toy emulsion 

pile-up in your camera gate? 


Troubled. Toy distracting camera 

noise when shooting snbjeots who 
should, not loe distracted from what 
tlrey are doing? 

Troubled by cameras tlrat are 
always in need of repair arid 
ad j ustment ? 

If so, switch to Auricon, the only 16mm Camera that 
guarantees you protection against all these troubles, 
because it is so well designed! The Auricon is a superb 
picture-taking Camera, yet silent in operation, so that 
at small extra cost for the Sound Equipment, it can 
even record Optical or Filmagnetic sound in addition 
to shooting your professional pictures. 





AURICON SUPER-1200, takes 1200 ft. Runs 33 

AURICON "PR0-600 SPECIAL," takes 400 ft. Runs 11 min. $1295.00 & up 

AURICON PRO-600, takes 600 ft. Runs I 6 V 2 min. $1871.00 & up 

* 

CINE-VOICE II, takes 100 ft. Runs 23/ 4 min. $998.50 & up 


Write for your free copy of the 74-page Auricon Catalog 

JtsA.C H A.XJ±cICO!Nr, Inc. 

6902 Romaine St., Hollywood 3 S. Calif, 
HO llywood 2 -O931 


MANUFACTURERS OK 1 PROFESSIONAL, 
IS MM CAMERAS SINCE 1931 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY. 1963 


9 













BUYS MILLION 
DOLLAR INVENTORY! 


Extra Savings 11 

for You!®”. - oo" 

CAMERAS 35MM " 

MITCHELL STANDARD, 4 fast lenses, 2-1000' _ 
mags., viewfinder, mattebox, 2 motors—115V * 

wild or 220V sync., Raby Blimp, freehead tripod. 

Excellent condition .$6750.00 mm 

AKEIEY AUDIO from Paramount News with full 
complement of lenses and matched finders, 12V 
motor, 1000' magazine, single system sound B 
recording modulator, amplifier, microphone. 

$10,000 originally .....$1995.00 

AKELEY AUDIO from Paramount News with full E 
complement of lenses and matched finders, 12V 
motor, 1000' magazine, single system less 

modulator .$1495.00 fl 

AKELEY NEWSREEL PANCAKE TYPE with 3 lenses 
and matched finders, 12V motor, 3 magazines, 

tripod. $3500 originally..$195.00 B 

ARRIFLEX I with 3 Zeiss lenses, 35/50/85mm, 
3-200' mags., 1-400' mag., Arriflex tripod, 3 _ 

cases. Good condition ..-.$1095.00 b 

BELL & HOWELL 35MM 2709 RACKOVER CAMERA 
with Unit I pilot pin movement, Cooke Speed b 
P anchro 25MM f2 lens, Astro Pan Tachar 40MM ® 
fl .8 lens, Baltar 50MM f2.3 lens, 75MM Cooke 
Speed Panchro f2 lens, 2 each 400'; 1000' mags, B 
erect image viewfinder, 220V 3ph synchronous * 

motor, matte box, sunshade .$4450.00 

BELL & HOWELL 35MM 2709 STANDARD CAMERA fl 
with Unit I pilot pin movement, 50MM Baltar f2.3 
lens. Astro 75MM f2.3 lens, 2—1000' magazines. 

Excellent condition . $1995.00 fl 

BELL & HOWELL 35MM EYEMO Q complete outfit. 

8 to 48 fps, spider turret, 3 lenses with filters, 
sunshades, motor, power cable, 2—400' mags., B 

drum finder. List value over $2000 .$795.00 

BELL & HOWELL 35MM EYEMO M complete out- 
fit. 8 to 48 fps, compact turret, 3 lenses with B 
filters, sunshades, drum finder. List value over 

$1500 .$495.00 m 

B & H EYEMO 71A with 47MM f2.5 Cooke ■ 

lens .$99.50 

CINEFLEX, 3 lenses, 2—200' magazines, 1—400' b 

magazine, motor and case . $595.00 ™ 

DEBRIE Model K with 3 lenses, 4—400'magazines, 

metal case. Direct focusing .$299.50 fl 

DEBRIE HIGH SPEED with 3 lenses, 12V motor, 
magazines; original cost over $3000 .... $395.00 

DEVRY NEWSREEL CAMERAS with 3 lenses, 12V fl 

motor . $149 50 

DEVRY NEWSREEL TYPE with 2" f3.5 focusing 

mount lens. Good condition .$125.00 B 

Same, less lens .$ 85.00 

WALL complete sound outfit with RCA Galva- 
nometer, recording amplifier, fabric blimp. B 

Reconditioned .$3495.00 

WALL single system with 4 lens turret, 2—1000' H 
magazines, 12V DC motor, viewfinder, tachometer, ™ 
counter, case, $6,580 originally. 

Serviceable condition .$ 995.00 b 

Reconditioned .$1995.00 ™ 

CAMERAS 16MM H 

AURICON PRO-200 (from Photo News) ....$ 395.00 

Reconditioned .$ 595.00 _ 

AURICON PRO 200 with Zoom Door, Parrish con- ' 
version for 400' or 1200' Mitchell magazines. In¬ 
cludes Modulite Galvanometer, NRS-24 Amplifier, b 

Less magazines. Excellent condition. $1195.00 ® 

BOLEX HI 6 with PAN CINOR, 60 zoom lens, 
26mm fl .9 Pizar, prismatic focusser, pistol grip. fl 

Very good condition .$249.50 ™ 

CINE SPECIAL Series I (from Photo News) 

.$ 395.00 fl 

Continued on Pages 72 and 14 

S.O.S. PHOTO-CINE-OPTICS, Inc. 

602 West 52nd St., New York 19, N.Y.—PLaza 7-0440 
Western Branch: 6331 Holly'd. Blvd., Hollyd. 28, Calif. 


WHAT’S NEW 

IN EQUIPMENT, ACCESSORIES, SERVICES 



SYNC SOUND RECORDER FOR BOLEX—Unique magnetic tape record¬ 
ing unit for Bolex H8 and H16 cameras is contoured to fit camera in place 
of door (arrow). Records on X A" tape—3" roll sufficient for recording 
sound for 100 ft. of picture film. Requires no camera alteration. Outfit 
includes transistorized amplifier, dynamic microphone, cables, monitoring 
phones. Net weight with battery is less than 2 lbs. Manufacturer is Louis 
S. Uhler, 15778 Wyoming Avenue, Detroit 38, Michigan. 



NEW MITCHELL VARI-STROKE CONTROL—Vari-Stroke control added 
to Mitchell NC and BNC film movements permits adjusting movement 
timing to match variations in film being used, resulting in quieter opera¬ 
tion of camera. Adjustment is self-locking and will not move unless turned 
by hand. Device is designed to obviate most of the difficulties encountered 
where age, climatic conditions, etc., have affected pitch or created dimen¬ 
sional changes in camera film stock. The Vari-Stroke enables the claw 
not only to move up and down, but also shortens or lengthens the stroke to 
accommodate the film’s dimensional changes. Mitchell Camera Corpora¬ 
tion, 666 West Harvard St., Glendale, Calif. 

Continued on Page 12 


0 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 























































We Idolize Service 

(THAT’S WHY WE’VE BUILT A NEW PLANT) 

We outgrew our old quarters. The new plant offers the most modern 
facilities obtainable anywhere. No color job will be beyond us, no tech¬ 
nical problem too technical. This is the world’s newest, most modern 
film processing plant—and we’re delighted to say “at your service.” 



Capital 

Film Laboratories, Inc. 


470 E St., S.W. • Washington 24, D.C. • District 7-1717 
SOUND, EDITORIAL AND ALL MOTION PICTURE LABORATORY SERVICES 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


11 








CORNERS MARKET 


* Extra Values 

— H 


LENSES ■ 

CORNEASCOPE 16MM Anamorphic Spread lens 
with 1 6MM projector adapter. B 

Brand new.$149.50 

ZOOM LENS FOR AKELEY NEWSREEL 35MM cam- 
era, f4.5 focus, 60MM to 350MM. Matched, ™ 
coupled viewfinder. Originally $7500. Good 
condition .$1395.00 _ 

CAMERA ACCESSORIES 

AURICON BLIMP for Cine Special with sync mo- ^ 

tor. Excellent condition.$395.00 

DOUBLE COMPARTMENT 35MM MAGAZINES, 
1000' capacity with transport mechanism and H 
aperture gate. Cost government $500. New....$99.50 
AKELEY GYRO Tripod with bowl and heavy duty h 

legs. Good condition.$495.00 

CECO GYRO Tripod, Jr. type legs and case. 
Excellent condition.$395.00 H 

ANIMATION AND 
SPECIAL EFFECTS EQUIPMENT 

ACME 7' Animation stand E/W/N/S movements, _ 
sliding pegs, B & H 35MM camera. Acme Stop- Hi 

motion motor.$3795.00 

BELL & HOWELL 35MM Animation Camera with h 
2 lenses, 2-400' or 1-1000' magazine. Unit 1 

Shuttle. $1495.00 

BELL & HOWELL 35MM Animation Camera with H 
lens, 2-400' or 1-1000' magazine, unit eye 
shuttle, prismatic through-the-lens focuser. 

Excellent condition .$2250.00 H 

BELL & HOWELL 35MM Animation Camera with 
rackover, Unit 1 Shuttle, 3 lenses, sunshade, h 
matte box, 2-400' or 1-1000' magazine & view- ™ 
finder. $6000 value.$3995.00 

LIGHTING EQUIPMENT ■ 

COLORTRAN 5000 Sr. Kit with two 5 light heads, 

2 stands & converter, like new.$195.00 H 

MOLE-RICHARDSON 150 amp. Molarc (Type 170) 
on pedestal; grid & cobles. $2410 value...$795.00 _ 

M-R or B & M Sr. 5000W Spots .$149.50 " 

5000W Spots on rolling stands .$199.50 

M-R or B & M Jr. 2000W Spots...$ 79.95 ® 

2000W Spots on rolling stands .$119.50 

RUBYLITE PORTABLE NEWSLITE with power- ■ 

pak in case, new demonstrators . $165.00 

RUBYLITE PORTABLE NEWSLITE with powerpak _ 

in case, new demonstrators ..$ 165.00 

RUBYLITE POWERPAK with charger. 

Demonstrators .$ 119.50 £ 

RECORDING EQUIPMENT 

AMPEX 600 Magnetic Recorder with synchronous I 
generator, playback amplifier and speaker in 2 

matched cases. $1000 value...$595.00 _ 

AURICON RT-80 VA Recorder less amplification. 

.—.-. $295.00 

AURICON RT-80 Optical Recorder with noise re- H 
duction amplifier, available VD or VA, service¬ 
able condition . $395.00 

Reconditioned . $525.00 H 

MAURER D 16MM Optical Recorder, twin track 
negative, 4 position mixer, noise reduction, ampli- _ 
fier 400' Magazine. Excellent condition....$3250.00 " 
STANCIL-HOFFMAN complete 16MM SYNCHRON¬ 
OUS MAGNET OUTFIT. 16MM recorder/playback | 
unit, two S4 dummy playbacks, all with Selsyn 
sync motors. Designed for double sprocketed cen¬ 
ter track, but one playback has been adapted to ■ 
single sprocketed edge track. Two portable cases 
for recorder, metal rack for playbacks. Cost over 
$6000 .. $1995.00 ■ 

See A/so Pages TO and 14 

Write for Complete Brochure. ■ 

S.O.S. PHOTO-CINE-OPTICS, Inc. 

602 West 52nd St., New York 19, N.Y.—PLaza 7-0440 
Western Branch: 6331 Holly'd. Blvd., Holly'd. 28, Calif. 


WHAT’S NEW IN EQUIPMENT, ACCESSORIES, ETC. 

Continued from Page 10 



SHORT LENGTH FILM PROCESSOR—Rapid processing of short lengths 
of film to check exposure, etc., prior to actual production shooting is af¬ 
forded by new Rapromatic Series 100 portable processor. Technique em¬ 
ploys Raproroll saturated web which is interleaved with film and effects 
processing of same when under forced contact in operation of the processor. 
Unit is available in a variety of manually-operated or motor-driven models 
which handle 16mm and/or 35mm film in casettes up to 100 ft. in length. 
List price is about $185.00. Fifty-foot 35mm Raprorolls are $7.25 each. 
Manufacturer is Rapromatic, Inc., 235 B Robbins Lane, Syosset, L.I., New 
York. 



ARRI SYNC SIGNAL GENERATOR—Now available as an original fac¬ 
tory installation on new 35mm Arriflex cameras is Arriflex sync signal 
generator affording synchronization of picture film with portable quarter- 
inch tape recorders in the production of sound films. The 60-cycle, 1.4-volt 
output of generator is compatible with all tape synchronous sound record¬ 
ing systems such as Rangertone, Echelon, Pilotone, etc. A marker light in 
camera automatically establishes start marks on film. The combination 
signal generator and start marker installation is available through all Arri¬ 
flex dealers. Signal generator only may be installed on any 16mm or 35mm 
Arriflex camera. Arriflex Corporation of America, 257 Park Avenue, South, 
New York 10, N. Y. 


12 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 

















































THIS SUPERB FILM MAKING EQUIPMENT 


■ 



CECO PRO JR. FRICTION HEAD TRIPOD 

with Revolutionary Ball Joint...TR8VB 

Net $190.00 

Assistant’s Ditty Bag Net $7.50 



CECO PROGRAMMER for Time-Lapse 
Applications Net $ 495.00 



WADDELL NOVA III 
16mm HIGH-SPEED CAMERA 

New features include simplified Timing 
block and Film Chip Reducer... 

Net From $2335.00 

3 year lease available 


CECO REFLEX MODIFICATION FOR THE 
35mm B&H EYEMO CAMERA 

Conversion Net $1200.00 

Camera with Conversion Net $1500.00 
This modification is also available for 
Mitchell and B&H 2709 Cameras at... 

Net $2500.00 



CECO HI SPEED EDITING TABLE 

With Torque Rewinds, Single -System 
Sound and Counter. Acceleration to 240 
feet per minute. Available in 16mm and 
35mm Models Net From $1750.00 

3 year lease available 



CECO 400' CONVERSION 

for CINE VOICE CAMERA Net $450.00 

400' Mitchell-type Magazine, addi¬ 
tional ... Net $135.00 




BAUER SELECTON 110 16 mm XENON 
OPTICAL & MAGNETIC PROJECTOR 


SOUND BLIMP FOR KODAK 
REFLEX CAMERA Net $1950.00 

KODAK REFLEX ACCESSORIES: 

Matte Box .Net $225.00 

Single Speed 

Stop Motion Motor Net $650.00 
Additional Single Speed Drives 
( 1 / 4 , V 2 , 1 Sec.) Net $150.00 

110 V. AC-DC Variable Speed motor 
with Tachometer Net $500.00 

Balanced Tripod for Blimp Net $460.00 
Pro Jr. Spring Head Tripod for Camera 
with Ball Joint CECO Model TR6VB ... 

Net $240.00 



5000 ft. capacity allows 2V2 hrs. of 
uninterrupted showing. Light output 
with 2000 watt Xenon measures 4,100 
lumens. Fills a Cinemascope screen 
over 40 ft. wide. 2-speed synchronous 
motor. 


1000' MAGAZINE FOR ARRIFLEX 
35mm CAMERA 

Complete with Veeder-Root Counter... 

Net $369.00 



16mm CECO PROFESSIONAL 
FILM VIEWER Net $375.00 

(Also available with Single System and or 
Double System magnetic installation). 


NICKEL CADMIUM PORTABLE 
POWER SUPPLY 

for Kodak Reflex, Auricon, Arriflex and 
other Cameras with 110 V. Synchronous 
motors. Complete with built-in charger... 

Net $325.00 

CECO Model PS 40 DD 


INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS, 
Please Note! 

— Ask us about our NEW 
“IN-PLANT STUDIO” PROGRAM. 



For full information and literature on these as well as the thousands of other professional cameras and accessories available from 


CECO, write or phone today. 


CAMERA EQUIPMENT CO., INC. 

FIRST IN SALES, SERVICE, RENTALS AND REPAIRS SUBSIDIARY OF CECO INDUSTRIES, INC. 



NEW YORK, N.Y. HIALEAH, FLORIDA HOLLYWOOD. CALIFORNIA 

315 West 43rd St. JUdson 6-1420 51 East 10th Ave. TUxedo 8-4604 6510 Santa Monica Blvd. HOIlywood 9-8321 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 





























Technical 
Questions and 
Answers 


S) S 9 8 8 § ■ I 


1 s.o.$. 


GIGANTIC SALE 

See Also Pages 1 2 anr 57 m 


EDITING, CUTTING ROOM 
SUPPLIES & ACCESSORIES 

MOVIOLA 16MM Model ULPVCS Black Preview 
sound one side, composite sound and picture on 
other, magnetic/optical. 

Excellent condition .$1995.00 

FILM HANDLING EQUIPMENT 

B & H Hot Pedestal Splicer, 35MM. 

Good condition . $595.00 

B & H Hot Pedestal Splicer, 7OMM. 

Good condition .-...-.$895.00 

FOSTER AUTOMATIC Rewind on table with in¬ 
spection life. 110V AC 60 cycle, heavy duty 
motor, foot pedal control, speeds zero to 875 RPM. 

New . $435.00 

PRESTO Hot Splicers, 16MM. 

Originally $747.00. Reconditioned .$495.00 

With interchangeable 16MM and 35MM heads, re¬ 
conditioned ..-.-.$595.00 

MOTION PICTURE PRINTERS 

ACE 35MM (from Photo News) .$295.00 

DUPLEX 35MM STEP PRINTER .$295.00 

(from Photo News) 

ACE 35MM Soundtrack Printer on pedestal, oper¬ 
ates with any picture. Good condition-$295.00 

BELL & HOWELL Printer Model D continuous 
contact 5-way aperture with original style lamp- 

house. Good condition .$1995.00 

B & H Model D Printer. Reconditioned....$2465.00 
B & H Model D Printer, with standard 300 watt 
hi-intensity lamphouse, blower cooled, DC rec¬ 
tifier. Rebuilt like new . $4495.00 

B & H 35MM Main Sprockets for D Printers. 

$500 value. New . $195.00 

CINECOLOR Double Head 35MM Step Printer 
with automatic lite change and timing device. 
Originally $12,000. (Bank Foreclosure). Good 

condition __—.-.$2495.00 

CUSTOM BUILT 35MM Step Printer on pedestal, 

pilot pin registration. Fair condition.$395.00 

DEPUE Optical Reduction Printer 35/16 picture 
with automatic light changer. 

Reconditioned . $3995.00 

DUPLEX AUTOMATIC 150 Scene Light Change 
Boards. $15,000 value (plus $20 crating)..$195.00 
DUPLEX 35MM Step Printer (2 machines in one). 

Excellent. Plus $35 crating.$295.00 

UHLER 16MM SOUND and PICTURE double head, 
originally $862, hardly used .$295.00 

FILM PROCESSING EQUIPMENT 

FILMLINE R15TC reversal/negative/positive ma¬ 
chine with refrigeration, bottom drains, air com¬ 
pressor, cushion-blo squeegee, variable speeds up 

to 1200 ft. per hour. Good condition.$2450.00 

FILMLINE Model R40TC reversal/negative/positive 
machine with refrigeration, recirculation pump, 
drain pump, air compressor. Originally $4865. 

Good condition - $2995.00 

GPL 401 Hi-Speed 16MM Spray Processor, neg./ 

pos. Originally $8000. Reconditioned.$2995.00 

HOUSTON-FEARLESS 16MM daylight loading mag. 
for all HF Processors. $300 val-$99.50 

HOUSTON-FEARLESS Model 1, 16MM neg./pos., 
variable speed. Reconditioned.....$895.00 

MAMMOTH HOUSTON Color Processor 16/35MM 
Ansco/Ektachrome, neg./pos. up to 1200 ft. per 
hour, 16 stainless steel tanks. Full temperature 
control. Recirculation, air supply 7 squeegees. 

Cost Cuban Gov't $35,000. 

Rebuilt like new .-.$11,995.00 

Many Other Extra Specials. 

Write for brochure. 

S.O.S. PHQTO-CINE-OPTICS, Inc. 

602 West 52nd St. # New York 19, N.Y.—PLaza 7-0440 
Western Branch: 6331 Holly’d. Blvd., Holly’d. 28, Calif. 



Q.- Will appreciate answers to the 

following questions relative to set light¬ 
ing: 

(1) How do the major studios pro¬ 
vide fill light on huge, very deep sets 
such as a typical ballroom set in 
costume dramas? Obviously, using 
broads placed at either side of the 
camera would flood only a very shal¬ 
low portion of the set nearest the 
camera. However, in the type of scene 
mentioned above, l have noticed that 
very deep sets are smoothly filled with 
light from front to back. This doesn’t 
appear to be spotlighting from the top 
of the set walls; it is too even for that, 
too soft. 

(2) What is the fundamental use of 
cone lights: Have they merely replaced 
double broads? Are they ever used for 
very soft key lighting? —J. W., Cum¬ 
berland, R. I. 

A.— Since all big sets erected in the 
studios have parallels overhead, illumi¬ 
nating such sets smoothly and in depth 
is a relatively simple matter. The lamps 
—usually 5K’s or 10 K’s—are mounted 
on the parallels and provide smooth illu¬ 
mination from overhead over the en¬ 
tire set. Very often these lamps are 
diffused, with spun glass or plain gela¬ 
tin diffusers, for improved illumination 
quality. 

Cone lights provide the cinematog¬ 
rapher with the nearest thing to “shad- 
owless’ light on the sound stage. They 
make ideal fill lights and are some¬ 
times used to replace broads or double 
broads. Of course, the Cone light takes 
up more space than does the broad. It 
is possible to use a Cone light for very 
soft key lighting, but studio cinematog¬ 
raphers prefer to use a modeling light 
plus a fill light, which can be con¬ 
trolled to give better definition, more 
interesting faces. 

Q.- How does the Gossen Lunasix 

meter compare with the Spectra ?-—- 
M. F., Oakville, Ontario, Canada. 

A. ——The Spectra is essentially an in¬ 
cident light meter, although it may also 
be used for reflected light readings. 
The Gossen Lunasix, on the other hand 
is basically a reflected light meter, al¬ 
though it is capable of incident light 


evaluation also. 

The Spectra’s large hemispheric 
light collector is ideally designed to 
provide high efficiency in collecting 
and measuring incident light falling 
on scene or subject from all angles. 

Both meters are highly sensitive in 
that light pickup is amplified by 
means of ultra-sensitive Cadmium Sul¬ 
phide cells incorporated in the light 
measuring system. 

Q.- For a film I am shooting on 

16mm Ektachrome Commercial, how 
can l create the illusion of a chest 
X-Ray being developed in a darkroom? 
—L. L. B., Springfield, Mo. 

A. -For the answer to your ques¬ 

tion, we consulted two different Holly¬ 
wood special effects specialists. Fol¬ 
lowing are their respective answers: 

You will need two X-Ray plates, 
both the same size, one blank, the 
other with completely developed X-Ray 
image. Photograph hand submerging 
blank plate in tray of solution. Hold 
it still, then withdraw hand from 
scene. Cap lens and wind back film 
to start of exposure, and remove cap 
for re-exposure. Place plate with de¬ 
veloped image in identical spot in tray 
as blank plate; fade-in and shoot a 
simple 3-foot dissolve. Place hand in 
same position as for first exposure, 
then lift and remove plate. Or ... . 

If shot is to be a static one, shoot 
once with blank X-Ray plate in tray, 
and second time with the developed 
plate in tray and with camera locked 
down. A long dissolve between the two 
shots should yield gradual appearance 
of image. 

Where the shot is to contain action, 
reversal system is probably easiest to 
handle. Here X-Ray plate is first ex¬ 
posed normally with the reverse of the 
desired image (i.e. neg for pos or vice 
versa). Then follow normal reversal 
processing, develop, bleach and clear. 
Process may be stopped at this point 
and plate exposed to white light. Plate 
may now be developed in the light 
while photographing with desired im¬ 
age fading in as development occurs. 
Reversal kit, chemicals and instruc¬ 
tions can be had at most photographic 
stores. ■ 


14 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 












































F & B Mark III 
with 

Viscomatic 

Head 


Sachtler-Wolf 
Double Gyro 
Model UK 


Sachtler-Wolf 
Double Gyro 
Model KA 


Miller 
Model D 


O’Connor 
Model C 


O’Connor 
Model 100 


Miller 

Professional 


Sputnick 


F&B TALKS ABOUT TRIPODS! 


Like some people we know, cameras don’t move by themselves; 
they have to be pushed around. 

A basic requirement in good camera movement is smoothness 
—a smooth beginning—middle and end when panning, tilting 
or both. 

Years ago, when we had to depend on friction heads for 
movement, most cameramen acquired great skill in using these. 
Also, many cameramen depended on geared heads cranked with 
both hands which required tremendous dexterity. 

Today, with our advancing technology; adapting principles of 
hydraulics and of gyroscopes we have evolved the fluid and 
gyro tripod heads. Great skill and dexterity is no longer an 
absolute requirement for fine, professionally smooth camera 


movement. Smoothness is now a built-in characteristic of each 
of the tripod heads shown here. We at F & B sell and recommend 
these most enthusiastically. 

If you are still doing great work with outmoded friction or 
geared heads, we congratulate you. Still we urge you to modern¬ 
ize. Why not treat yourself to one of these fine fluid or gyro 
head outfits, and see if you don’t agree that it makes your 
work easier. 

With the help of many skilled cameramen, we have made up 
a chart so that you could select the outfit most suited to your 
needs. If you want more detailed information on any of these, 
or if you would like to “try out” or arrange for a demonstration 
with no obligation, please write us. 



WEIGHT 


PRICE 


Tripod Only 
$1975.00 


SPUTNIK 


Tripod & Head 
$369.50 


HOW TO 
SELECT 
YOUR 
TRIPOD 


ASK F & B 


There is nothing 
our expert tech¬ 
nicians like bet¬ 
ter than talking 
equipment with 
you. 


Complete infor¬ 
mation and liter¬ 
ature on all types 
of professional 
equipment are 
yours for the 
asking. 


NCE HYDRO FLUID 


SERVING THE WORLD’S FINEST FILM MAKERS 


68 West 45th Street New York 36, New York Murray Hill 2-2928 


MILLER PRO 


SACHTLER WOLF 
DOUBLE GYRO K A 


Tripod & Head 
$795.00 


SACHTLER-WOLF 
DOUBLE GYRO U K 


Tripod & Head 
$795.00 


MILLER ’’D” 


Head Only 
$150.00 


7 lbs. 


Head Only 
$299.50 


10 lbs. 


O’CONNOR 200-A 


Head 18 lbs 
Legs 12 lbs 


Head 18 lbs. 
Legs 12 lbs. 


Tripod & Head 
$139.50 


14 lbs. 


Head Only 
$295.00 


O’CONNOR 100 


Head Only 
$2250.00 


F&B MARK II 
VISCOMATIC 


O'CONNOR C 


6 lbs. 


Head Only 
$695.00 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


1 



















































the ONE 
PACKAGE 
deal from 

JACK A. FROST / 

.. saves you TIME and 
money on PRODUCTION 
RENTAL needs!.... 


JACK A.FROST 


COBO HALL OFFICE: 401 Washington Bivd. 
Rm. 3143, WO 2-1255, Detroit 26, Michigan 


MAIN OFFICE: 234 Piquette 
TR 3-8030, Detroit 2,Michigan 


CANADIAN OFFICE: 6 Shawbridge, 
BEImont 2-1145, Toronto, Canada 


16 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 




ANOTHER FIRST BY PRECISION! THE ONLY 


PATENTED 


□□□ 




00 SYNCHRONIZER 





MODEL 


SR16 


16mm 


Sprocket 


Assembly 

m fgl 

with 0-40 


Frame Plate 

■ # 





MODEL 

SR-35 

35mm 
Sprocket 
Assembly 
with 0-16 
frame plate 


MODEL 

S-616-1AN 

8mm Nomad 
Sprocket 
Assembly, 
complete 
with 

magnetic 

attachment. 


MODEL 

S616-2SP 

Counter for 
measuring 
in seconds, 
minutes, 
hours. 


MODEL 


S616-1A0 


16mm 


Optical 


Sound Head 

f afciSS^P *mr- % 

Sprocket 

• m * 

r: , 

« • 

Assembly 



MODEL 

* 

GB-35 

*T“ 

Precision 

i§|. 

•i ;h^- v 

Gear 

Assembly 


& 

II ^ „ 4§ t 

Decoupling 

C \ v > \ >\, Y 

»*Q 

Gear 

** "a ' ' 

% # 

Assembly. 


1:1 



Add or subtract units as you need them 
when you need them with these components 

You can now purchase a synchronizer and be able to add-a- 
unit whenever the need is there. It is not necessary to put 
your unit aside, because you have outgrown it, or change 
your mode of operation. We have developed this unitized 
system to give the film editor a flexible piece of precision 
equipment. 


*Units for assembling combination synchs. 

• Footage Counter — reset type 

• Precision ball-bearings & oiless 

bearings throughout 

• Large sprockets to S. M. P. T. E. standards 

16mm—40 frames 35mm—1 6 frames 

• Dural tension rollers — adjusted individually 

• Finger tip release 

• Perfect control — convenient hand wheel 

• Individual frame movement — shaft slip lock 

• Table mounting feet with rubber pads 

• Attractive hammertone finish 

• Simple coupling method for unitized assemblies 



AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY. 1963 


17 

















































Jock-Steady Prints 


are YODRS 

with 


TEL-Amatic 


Prints color, black-&-white, reversal, sound or silent films 
with rock-steady professional precision. Has many out¬ 
standing features found only in much higher priced pro¬ 
fessional printers. Sufficient light is provided to expose 
fine grain film. Semi-automatic light change assures per¬ 
fect exposures. Write for brochure. 


PROFESSIONAL continuous contact sound & Qnly CIQQjj 
picture printer for 16mm or double 8mm films v 1 » ^ 


PRINTER 


S.O.S. PHOTO-CINE-OPTICS, INC. 


602 WEST 52ND STREET, NEW YORK 19, N. Y. • Phone: PLaza 7-0440 • Telegram: “FAX, N. Y.” 
WESTERN BRANCH: 6331 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood 28, California • Phone: 467-2124 

-SEE OFFERINGS OF EXTRA-SPECIAL VALUES ON PAGES 7, 10, 12, 14, 53 AND 57 -<- 



This is the latest IMPROVED 

(INEKAD JUNIOR DOLLY 


Write for more details and prices. 


CINEKAD ENGINEERING CO. 

763 10th Ave., N.Y., N.Y., PLaza 7-3511 


Used Nationally by 
Discriminating Cameramen 


This 3-Wheel Collapsible Dolly Is 

especially designed to meet the demand for con¬ 
venient mobility of cameras on location or in 
the studio. 

The new model instead of the 
4" wheels is constructed with 5" 
heavy duty rubber-tired swivel 
wheels. 


r 


■N 


FOR MORE INFORMATION about products or serv¬ 
ices advertised in this issue, use the convenient postage- 
paid inquiry card facing the last page. Simply fill it 
out and mail. We’ll do the rest. 


—AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER 
---/ 


Literature 

BOOKLETS, CATALOGUES AND BROCHURES 
AVAILABLE FROM EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS 


Splicing and Repair Tapes 

Permacel, New Brunswick, New Jer¬ 
sey, manufacturer of pressure-sensitive 
tapes, electrical insulating materials 
and adhesives, has prepared a new de¬ 
scriptive folder on its Permacel F ilm 
Splicing and Repair Tapes, which are 
made of Mylar for motion picture and 
magnetic film. 

© 

Colortrends Newsletter 

ColorTran Industries, 630 South 
Flower St., Burbank, Calif., manufac¬ 
turers of specialized lighting equipment 
for motion picture and Television, is 
publishing periodically ColorTrends, a 
new 4-page bulletin that includes arti¬ 
cles and photographs of company’s 
various items of equipment in practical 
use. Readers of A.C. are invited to be 
placed on mailing list to receive copies 
of the new publication. 

• 

Bulletin on Recording 

Emcee is title of new publication is¬ 
sued periodically by Magnasyne Cor¬ 
poration, 5546 Satsuma Avenue, North 
Hollywood, Calif. Edited specifically 
for Magnasync’s many customers and 
prospective customers, bulletin illus¬ 
trates and describes interesting applica¬ 
tions of Magnasyne equipment. Com¬ 
pany manufactures magnetic sound re¬ 
cording and playback equipment. 

• 

Microphone Literature 

A new products brochure describing 
six new Shure microphones is available 
from Shure Brothers, Inc., Evanston, 
Ill. It includes specifications and prices 
on company’s latest microphones, plus 
information on its new quick-discon- 
nect microphone isolation units and a 
new transistorized stereo preamplifier. 


Film Flow Charts 

Professional methods of processing 
motion picture film are described in a 
set of eight flow charts recently pub¬ 
lished as producer service bulletins by 
General Film Laboratories, 1546 North 
Argyle Avenue, Hollywood 28, Calif. ■ 


18 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 




























IN THE EAST...IT'S MOVIELAB 



FOR COLOR AND BLACK & WHITE 

DEVELOPING COLOR NEGATIVES . ADDITIVE COLOR PRINTING • REDUCTION 
PRINTING INCLUDING A& B • COLOR SLIDE FILM PROCESSING . BLOWUPS • 
INTERNEGATIVES • KODACHROME SCENE-TO-SCENE COLOR BALANCED PRINTING 
• EKTACHROME DEVELOPING AND PRINTING • REGISTRATION PRINTING • PLUS 


COMPLETE BLACK AND WHITE FACILITIES INCLUDING CUTTING ROOMS, FILM M0V|EUB BU|LD|NG 6lg WESI 54IH „ T 
AND TAPE VAULTS AND THE FINEST SCREENING FACILITIES IN THE EAST NEW YORK 19, new YORK . JUdson 60360 







featuring Sy/vania's new 
Zoom Movie Lite / 



Use ‘flood’ for 
close to .medium 
lighting...‘spot’ 
for distance. 


Three-way 
switch: flood/ 
off/spot; one- 
finger operation. 


T 


Built-in carbon 
collector keeps 
lamp output and 
color constant. 


Entirely new! Ideal for zoom movies, 
wide-angle or telephoto! Compact, light¬ 
weight, cool, holds any camera. Replace¬ 
able long-life lamp; 16 hours 
(8 each filament). Head is 
adjustable up to 90° bounce. 

With camera mounting bracket. 

At Better Dealers Everywhere / 

FLEX ELECTRIC 
PRODUCTS, INC. 

39-08 24th Street 
Long Island City 1, N.Y. 



LESS THAN 

$|300 


BEHIND 


WHAT THE INDUSTRY'S 



ERAS 


OTING LAST MONTH 


H I N S 


NOTE: Asterisks following titles indicate television film productions. 


AMERICAN-INTERNATIONAL 

Gilbert Warrenton, ASC, “Bikini” (Michol- 
son-Arkoff Prod.) with Tab Hunter and 
Frankie Avalon. Anthony Carras, director. 

ALLIED ARTISTS 

Floyd Crosby, ASC, “Black Zoo” (Herman 
Cohen Prod., P’Vision & Eastman color) 
with Michael Gough and Rod Lauren. Rob¬ 
ert Gordon, director. 

CASCADE STUDIOS 

Henry Freulich, ASC, Commercials*. 

Roy Seawright, Commercials*. 

CBS—N.Y. 

Charles Mack, Leo Rossi, Robert Clem¬ 
ens, “CBS Reports”*. 

Fred Hoffman, Mike Zingale, “Candid 
Camera”*. 

COLUMBIA STUDIOS 

James Drought, Commercials** 

Gordon Avil, ASC, “The Candy Web” 
(Wm. Castle Prod.; Eastman color) with 
Kathy Dunn and Murray Hamilton. William 
Castle, producer-director. 

Philip Tannura, ASC, Irving Lippman, 
“Route 66”*. 

Robert Wycoff, “Dennis the Menace”*; 
Commercials*. 

Robert Pittack, ASC, “Mr. Smith Goes 
to Washington”*. 

Joseph Biroc, ASC, “Grindl”* (pilot). 
Charles Lawton, ASC, Commercials*. 


Burnett Guffey, ASC, Commercials”*. 

Robert Bronner, ASC, Commercials*. 

Christopher Challis, “The Victors” (High¬ 
road Prod.; P’Vision; shooting in England) 
with Vincent Edwards and Christine Kauf- 
mann. Carl Foreman, producer-director. 

Charles Welborn, “Empire”*. 

Richard Rawlings, “Higgins”*. 

Fred Gately, ASC, “Hazel”*. 

Gert Andersen, ASC, “Donna Reed Show”*. 

DESILU—Cahuenga Studio 
Robert deGRASSE, ASC, “The Danny Thomas 
Show”*; “Dick VanDyke Show”*. 

Maury Gertsman, ASC, “I’m Dickens—He’s 
Fenster”*. 

Henry Cronjacf.r, “The Joey Bishop 
Show”*. 

Sid Hickox, ASC, “The Andy Griffith 
Show”*. 

DESILU—Culver City 

Lothrop Worth, ASC, “The Real Mc¬ 
Coy’s”*. 

Charles Straumer, “The Untouchables”*. 
DESILU—Gower 

Hai. Mohr, ASC, “Breaking Point”* (pilot). 

Ralph Woolsey, ASC, “Morrison’s Re¬ 
treat”* (pilot). 

Maury Gertsman, ASC, “The Lucy Show”*. 
Ted Voichtlander, “Ben Casey”*. 

Edward Fitzgerald, ASC, “Lassie”*. 
Robert Planck, ASC, “My Three Sons”*. 

Continued on Page 56 



20 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 



























































































PRODUCTION 

HEADACH 

WE CAN SOLVE WITH CONFIDENCE! 


1. LIGHTING 



SincG 

1921 ... 



INC. 


2. GRIP EQUIPMENT 


3. PROPS 


4. GENERATORS 

1800. 1600. 1000 Amp. D C. Trucks 
700 Amp. D.C. Trailers 
100. 50. 30. 20. A C. 




LARGEST SUPPLIERS OF MOTION PICTURE. TV AND 

INDUSTRIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT IN THE EAST 


333 WEST 52 STREET, NEW YORK 19, N. Y., Circle 6-5470 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


21 






















Photographing A Walt Disney Production 

Edward Caiman, ASC, who has filmed six feature films to date for Walt 
Disney, found new and exciting photographic challenges in “Savage Sam.” 


Scattered around a clump of 
oak trees halfway up a parched 
mountainside in California’s San 
Fernando Valley, six Hollywood 
stunt riders, decked out in the Ver¬ 
million hues and war bonnets of 


By DARRIN SCOT 


Apache warriors, and 50 specially 
trained horses wait impatiently to 
begin one of the most difficult and 
spectacular scenes ever attempted 
for Walt Disney’s feature motion 
picture, “Savage Sam.” 


Surrounding a small lake below 
the horses and riders, six camou¬ 
flaged camera crews under the 
supervision of Director of Photo¬ 
graphy Edward Coleman, ASC, 
zero-in on a seven-foot high, twen¬ 
ty-foot wide precipice. Director 
Norman Tokar shatters the tense 
silence with the command, "Okay 
—let’s roll ’em!” 

"Camera one, speed—camera 
two, speed—camera three, speed,” 
and so on, the operators report 
from around the lake. 

“Action!,” the director shouts 
over the P.A. system. “Bring on 
the horses!” 

fhe whoop and holler of the 
wranglers in Indian disguise rings 
through the air, and slowly, two 
at a time, then galloping four and 
five abreast, the horses careen 
down the sheer slope and into the 
lake. 

“Number one, clear!” shouts 
the assistant director. Down a nar- 
row p a t h gallops the fi r s t 
“Apache.” His mount leaps off the 
embarkment and into the lake. 

“Number two, clear!,” and down 
come two youngsters on a big bay. 
The horse hurtles off the barrier 
into the water. 

“Number three, clear,” The 
third “Apache” spurs his horse 
down the path and off into the now 
crowded lake. 

“Number four, clear!” Two 
riders on separate horses gallop 
down the hill together, then plunge 
off the cliff almost simultaneously 
in a breathtaking leap. 

When the director yells, “Cut!,” 
the 150 -man motion picture crew 
hurts into spontaneous applause. 

AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 



THE CAMERA CREW in action filming a running camera shot for “Savage Sam," Walt Disney’s 
latest. As the camera car moves swiftly .booster lights are played on the actors, the mike man 
has the microphone pointed properly, the director keeps in touch with other technicians by radio 
phone, and the still man shots a record of the action. 


22 






HERE MAY BE SEEN five of the six Mitchell cameras used by Ed Colman 
to cover all angles of big climactic scene for “Savage Sam,” photo¬ 
graphed in Eastman Color. The camera equipment and the barges on 


which some of the cameras will be mounted are being made ready 
under the supervision of Colman and director Norman Tokar (out of 
picture). 


The actual filming of this spec¬ 
tacular sequence took only one 
minute and fifteen seconds, but the 
planning and preparation required 
much time and effort of a large 
crew of technical experts. The de¬ 
cision to use six cameras simul¬ 
taneously to film it—a procedure 
virtually non-existent in present- 
day, budget-minded Hollywood— 
was prompted by the fact that con¬ 
siderable production time could be 
saved because a single take could 
produce six different camera an¬ 
gles of the intricate sequence, with 
the action perfectly matched — 
greatly minimizing the need to 
repeat the complicated maneuvers 
with the horses and avoiding delays 
necessary for separate camera set¬ 
ups. 

Four cameras were located at 


various vantage points on the lake 
shore, while two others were posi¬ 
tioned on a raft anchored in the 
middle of the lake to record closer 
shots of the horses swimming to¬ 
ward them. As the animals leaped 
off the cliff, low camera angles 
helped to exaggerate the height of 
the jump; also use of lenses of 
different focal lengths provided 
variety for the editor in cutting the 
sequence. 

“Savage Sam,” a sequel to the 
highly successful Disney film, ‘"'Old 
Yeller,” made four years ago, is 
an outdoor action epic having to 
do with dogs, horses, Indians and 
kidnapped children. It may have 
set some sort of record in that 
95% of its scenes are actual ex¬ 
teriors shot in various picturesque 
locations not far from Hollywood. 


The horse-jump sequence was 
filmed on the sprawling Albertson 
Ranch, 13,000 acres of scenic mo¬ 
tion picture locations near Thou¬ 
sand Oaks in the San Fernando 
\ alley. Featuring a variety of ter¬ 
rain—including lakes, mountains, 
unusual vegetation, sculptured 
rocks and giant trees—the ranch 
is used regularly by film com¬ 
panies. Much of the “Gunsmoke” 
television series is photographed 
here. 

Additional scenes were shot at 
Escondido Canyon, a starkly 
eroded area studded with over¬ 
hanging rocks. Still other scenes 
were filmed at the scenic Walt 
Disney Ranch near Saugus, a land¬ 
locked Shangri-La with clear air 
and blue skies free of the smog 

Continued on Page 40 

23 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 








The factors that affect the quality 
and the cost of your release prints. 


TThe basic stages are essentially the same in all 
A 35mm B&W motion picture production: expose 
camera stock, process it, print a working copy, edit, 
conform, make the first intermediate negatives and/ 
or masters, make a first trial print, and finally the 
release prints. There are, however, some choices that 
can be made within these stages. 

During the shooting of a production, a record of 
all takes is noted on the camera log (or scene-and- 
take sheets), with notations to print or not to print 
the various takes. Following the processing of the 
negative, the laboratory follows these instructions 
and removes the unwanted takes before printing. 
Obviously, this serves two purposes: it saves money 
and it is a first step in the process of editing the 
film, since it eliminates unwanted material from the 
footage that is to be handled by the editor. 

After the unwanted takes are removed by the 
laboratory and the remaining negative footage is 
spliced, the dailies are printed. Although there is 
occasional demand for one-light dailies, the normal 
requirement is for timed dailies which enables the 
producer to estimate his eventual release print qual¬ 
ity while screening the daily footage. 

Ultimately the dailies are edited and strung to¬ 
gether to form what is known as the workprint. 
Sometimes a producer will require an additional 
copy of the workprint so that the sound recording 
department and the film editor can work on the 
picture simultaneously. In such instances, the usual 
practice is to make a temporary dupe negative from 
the edited workprint and a temporary positive print 
from the temporary dupe. While it is true that an¬ 
other set of dailies can be made from the camera 
negative, this is inadvisable because it would subject 
the negative to additional and unnecessary handling, 
and it would also involve the additional work of 
conforming the second set of dailies to the first work- 
print. 

In the matter of release prints, there are two 


choices available to the producer, and the choice he 
makes will partially determine the other laboratory 
services. His prints may be made directly from the 
edited camera negative or from a dupe negative. 
The printing choice may involve both 35mm and 
16mm, the latter being provided by reduction print¬ 
ing from the edited camera negative, or by contact 
printing from a 16mm dupe negative—with the dupe 
reduction printed from a 35mm master positive. 

The factors involved in making the choice be¬ 
tween printing from camera negative or dupe nega¬ 
tive include print image quality and price and size 
of the print order—the latter considered in relation 
to the life expectancy of the printing negative. 

Here the question naturally arises: “Just what is 
the life expectancy of an edited 35mm negative?*’ 

Each passage of the negative through the printer 
may result in scratching or other damage to the 
film. This can happen even where the laboratory has 
the most modern machinery plus the latest mechani¬ 
cal and electronic safeguards, and strict standards 
governing the handling of customers’ film in the 
print. A continuous movement printer is gentler with 
film than a step-printer, which is the type printer 
used in reduction-printing. But any printing opera¬ 
tion has some element of hazard. 

In the production of 35mm release prints on a 
continuous printer, the number of acceptable quality 
prints made from a 35mm edited camera negative 
has run up over six hundred, but the normal run of 
quality prints is closer to two hundred. In making 
individual 16mm reduction prints, the average is 
around one hunderd quality prints, although there 
are instances where much higher totals have been 
achieved. 

The price advantage is with the 16mm contact 
print from a 16mm dupe negative reduction-printed 
from the 35mm master positive. This is because the 
16mm dupe negative is fully timed, has all the 
necessary effects incorporated—making it possible 


24 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 



to produce the required release prints on a continu¬ 
ous printer without the need for scene-to-scene light 
changes. 

There is a price advantage also where 35mm re¬ 
lease prints are made from a 35mm dupe negative 
that is fully timed and requires no light changes in 
the printing operation. Obviously, the less work the 
laboratory must do in making each release print, 
and the faster a printing machine can be safely 
operated, the lower the price of the printed product 
to the customer. 

Regarding the matter of quality, the fewer the 
intermediate steps the better the product—as a rule. 
As one might reasonably expect, 35mm prints from 
edited 35mm camera negative are more pleasing 
visually than prints made from a dupe negative. One 
can observe this quality in screened prints where it 
is possible to compare optical effects portions with 
other footage in the same picture. 

Similarly, the 16mm reduction print may be ex¬ 
pected to have better definition, contrast, and over¬ 
all tonal quality than the 16mm contact print made 
from a reduction-printed negative. Nevertheless, the 
16mm contact prints from reduction negatives we 


FLOW CHARTS below show progressive steps in the production of 
release prints from 35mm B&W negative, also the 35/32mm method 
for producing 16mm positive prints from B&W films. Charts are repro¬ 
duced from series of Producer Service Bulletin issued by General Film 
Laboratories, Hollywood. 


see today are, on the average, very good—especially 
when the 16mm reduction negative is made on 
35/32mm stock and the prints are also made on 
35/32mm positive, then slit to 16mm widths. This 
dual-printing method combined with today’s im¬ 
proved film stocks, modern printing methods, and 
close control of processing procedures results in 
16mm contact prints very close in quality to the 
reduction print—and without involving the normal 
hazards of reduction printing. 

In actual practice, most small orders are produced 
from the 35mm camera negative—both 35mm con¬ 
tact and 16mm reduction. Most 35mm release print 
orders—up to around 200 prints—are normally 
made from the camera negative. But larger orders 
in 35mm, and 16mm release orders of 100 to 200 
prints, will usually be produced from a dupe nega¬ 
tive. In either case, the producer will require certain 
35mm fine grain positive and 35mm dupe negative 
materials. 

In printing from an edited single-roll camera 
negative, all dissolves and other special visual effects 
are provided by making optical dupe negative sec¬ 
tions of these effects which are cut into the main 
body of the camera negative. This process requires 
the making of (1) fine grain 35mm positives of the 
scenes involved in the effects, and (2) the projection 
(or optical) printing of the 35mm dupe negative sec¬ 
tions with the effects incorporated. 

Continued on Page 54 


. o 

GENERAL 

PRINTING f LOW CHART 

■o 

GENERAL 

THE 35/32mm METHOD FOR PRODUCING 16mm 

PRODUCE*! ' 

SERVICE I 0 
6UUETin| U 

35mm BLACK/WHITE NEGATIVE 

PRODUCER 1 « 

SERVICE I C. 
BULLETIN 1 U 

POSITIVE PRINTS FROM BLACK/WHITE FILMS 



REBIJCTICN PRINTING 


REDUCTION PRINTING 


SOUNO 

MASTER 


RE RECORDING 


35/32 

SOUND 

NEGATIVE 


CONTACT PRINTING 


CONTACT PRINTING 


35mm BfW 
Master 
Positive 


35/32mm 

B/W 

Positive 

Print 


REDUCTION PH1HHNG 


.(INTACT PRINTING 


RECOCT ivN PBINTINS 


r*C» PRINTl 


PfOUI'.TlON 


SOUND 

MASTER 


35mm 

SOUND 

NEGATIVE 


16mm 

SOUND 

NEGATIVE 


AE-RECOROiNf. 


CONTACT PRINTING 


BfW::? 

Negative 


35mm BfW 
Master 
Positive 


35mm B/W 
Release 
Print 




35mm B/W 
Daily 

Work Print 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


25 

















































CINEMATOGRAPHER Marvin Farkas (left) and as¬ 
sistant setting up Arriflex 16 camera for a high 
shot during filming of "Bozo's Adventures In Asia" 
for WHDH-TV. 


'T'he decision of TV station 
WHDH of Boston, Mass., to 
send its local clown “Bozo” on a 
goodwill tour of Asia in coopera¬ 
tion with UNICEF, provided 
Marvin Farkas, Hong Kong-based 
cinematographer, with a hectic 
filming assignment that took him 
to six countries. 

In the course of the two-month 
odyssey, the TV film unit shot 
enough footage for ten half-hour 
shows for WHDH’s series entitled 
“Bozo’s Adventures in Asia,” plus 
a series of personality interviews. 
Farkas, his assistant, Y. B. Tang, 
Frank Avruch (who plays Bozo 
in the local Boston area) and Vir¬ 
ginia Bartlett, producer and direc¬ 
tor, not only visited many major 
Far East cities, but also traveled 
extensively in the rural areas where 
UNICEF does much of its work. 

To film the “Bozo” segments 
Farkas used a 16mm Arriflex and 
a Bell & Howell Filmo. For the 
sound interviews an Auricon cam¬ 
era converted to accommodate a 
400-ft. magazine and equipped 
with a zoom lens was used. 

Farkas and his crew filmed in 
Hong Kong, the Philippines, Tai¬ 
wan, Thailand, Burma, India and 
Pakistan. Much of the shooting 
was done outdoors to take advan¬ 
tage of local scenic values of the 


Filming In Asia 
For American TV 

New adventures of Bozo the clown filmed 
in 16mm color in Far East locales. 

By CLIFFORD V. HARRINGTON 

UNICEF photos by J. Ling 



SUBJECT OF the TV film series—Bozo t 
elephant in India. Meantime the camera 
Filming was in 16mm color. 


countries and to avoid the neces¬ 
sity for extensive indoor lighting. 
Also, sequences were planned with 
a bit of plot whenever possible to 
provide more interest and tighter 
continuity. 

One such vignette shot in the 
exotic Gardens of Shalimar, in La¬ 
hore, Pakistan, shows a little boy, 
sad and alone. Then Bozo in his 
incongruous costume appears and 
cheers him up. Other children 
gather to watch. For the final cut 
Bozo raises his hands and by prior 
arrangement the beautiful foun¬ 
tains in the background spout up. 

The photography kept camera¬ 
man Farkas on his toes. The 
UNICEF organization had planned 



ie Clown—played by Frank Avruch, mounts an 
recorded antics for the American TV film series. 


a crowded schedule for the crew, 
so Farkas had to draw heavily on 
his newsreel experience in setting 
up and photographing quickly. 

One of the important tasks was 
to get unobtrusive shots of the 
youngsters reacting to the Ameri¬ 
can clown, Bozo. But in one case 
the crew got tears of fright in¬ 
stead of howls of laughter. When 
Bozo was announced and came 
bounding into the room, the native 
children were thunderstruck by 
his red wig and shiny red nose. 
Never in their wildest dreams had 
they imagined such a character. 

“Even we were surprised,” Far¬ 
kas said. “Bozo approached one 
child, who seemed not as frightened 


26 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 




as the rest, and gained his confi¬ 
dence, and similarly, he won the 
others over and the filming contin¬ 
ued.” 

The dark skins of the local 
people contrasted sharply with the 
white or bright colors of their 
clothing, which presented a prob¬ 
lem of determining the best ex¬ 
posure to use. In such instances he 
compromised on the lens setting 
and trusted the latitude of the 
Ektachrome Commercial film to 
provide the correct light balance. 

Farkas and his crew experienced 
many unusual weather conditions 
during the trip. In India, fortu¬ 
nately, it was not yet the monsoon 
season and there was bright sun¬ 
shine every day. 

“The strangest thing we en¬ 
countered was unusual sand condi¬ 
tions in Pakistan,” Farkas said. 
“It was as fine as powder and it 
hung over the area in a cloud. We 
didn’t take our cameras out of 
their cases until the sand blew 
away, which was several days af¬ 
ter we arrived.” 

Continued on Page 53 


FULL RANGE 

for demanding cinematography ... 

MITCHELL 


16mm, 35mm and 65mm Standard and High-Speed Mitchell cameras for TV, 
theatrical and industrial photography, and 70mm Mitchell cameras are avail¬ 
able to your individual requirements. 

Mark il 35mm reflex studio camera orders now being taken. 

Write for new brochure. 



Precision 


cameras 
for professional 
film making 


Underwater ... or Outer Space are extremes calling for special cameras 
and versatile equipment to assure positive and accurate results for engineer¬ 
ing evaluation. Mitchell cameras and complete tracking units designed 
to your specifications are available to meet the most demanding motion 
picture requirements. 


USING 16mm ARRIFLEX and Ektachrome Com¬ 
mercial film, cameraman Farkas photographs 
colorful detail of oriental temple in Rangoon, 
Burma, as part of his WHDH-TV assignment. 




SPECIAL CAMERA DESIGNS The experienced Mitchell team offers 45 years of 
experience in design and engineering projects for special motion picture 
equipment. The most advanced group of camera engineers, production and 
test technicians in the motion picture industry is available to meet your 
special requirements. 

85% of the professional motion pictures shown throughout the world are filmed with 
Mitchell cameras. Your inquiry is welcomed. Write Sales Department for the Mitchell catalog. 



MITCHELL 

CAMERA CORPORATION 

666 W. HARVARD ST., GLENDALE, CALIFORNIA 


AGENTS: Mitchell Camera of New York, Inc. • 521 Fifth Avenue ■ New York, New York 
Vinten Mitchell Ltd. • 715 North Circular Rd. • London, N.W. 2, England 
Nagase & Co., Ltd. • 3, 2-Chome Kobunacho • Nihonbashi, Chuoku ■ Tokyo, Japan 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


27 


























ZOOM 

LENS 

TECHNIQUE 


Why zoom shots and tracking shots 
differ in perspective. 

By ARTHUR GRAHAM, BKS* 


^he idea OF combining different focal lengths 
within one lens goes back many years in the 
history of photography, and lenses were in fact de¬ 
signed so that by using all the components one focal 
length was obtained, and then with certain compo¬ 
nents detached this focal length would be increased, 
although with a smaller f/number. This uncom¬ 
bined lens frequently suffered from optical defects. 
In the early nineteen-thirties the idea was taken a 
step further in lenses intended for motion picture 
production, which allowed the focal length to be 
changed not by the removal of any components but 
by the movement of the parts of the lens in rela¬ 
tion to one another. They still had the disadvan¬ 
tage however of the necessity of using a small 
aperture if a “zoom” was made, in order to obtain 
acceptable quality, “zoom” being the word used 
to describe the action of changing continuously 
from one focal length to another. The film indus¬ 
try did not show a great deal of interest in these 
lenses, possibly because of the price (which was 
high) and also because of the exposure difficulties 
inherent in their use; and as a result, no further 
work was undertaken along these lines until after 
World War II. Lenses were then made in which 
the widest aperture could be used throughout all 
the varying focal lengths. Television companies 
quickly realized that this new piece of equipment 
was ideally suited for a large amount of the work 
they had to undertake, if indeed their demands 
had not in fact stimulated its production. And from 


Reprinted by permission from Vol. 41, No. 3, of British 
Kinematography. Author Graham is Films Officer for 
Bowater Paper Corporation. Ltd.. London. 



WITH HIS ZOOM-EQUIPPED Bolex mounted on the bed of his station 
wagon, cinematographer Roy Zeper has the dual advantage of both 
the zoom and tracking shot, depending on the demands of the script. 


there its use has spread into all branches of film 
making. 

The effect of altering the focal length of a lens 
while filming—in other words “zooming”—is to 
change the angle of view. If the lens is set at a 
wide angle and is then changed to a narrow angle, 
the result is a concentration on some detail of the 
original long shot. Reversing the process and going 
from a narrow angle to a wider one gives the effect 
of placing a detail seen at the start into a wider 
setting. 

The usual method employed in film making to 
achieve these two effects has been the tracking shot. 
The camera is mounted on a truck-—known as a 
“dolly”—and is moved backwards and forwards 
as required in relation to the objects being filmed. 
It may also be mounted on a crane in which case 
the movement of the camera can be vertical as 



FIG. 1—long shot—showing perspective before tracking or zooming. 


28 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 























well as horizontal. Tracking shots are mainly used 
in a production either for the purposes already 
mentioned, or in order to maintain a fairly con¬ 
stant spatial relationship with a moving object. In 
other words, moving along with the object being 
filmed. 

Does the zoom lens replace normal tracking shots? 
As can be seen from the above, it can only act as a 
substitute for those shots where the camera is mov¬ 
ing towards or away from the object. It cannot give 
the second type of tracking shot—moving with the 
subject—except under special circumstances of posi¬ 
tioning. And although it can be used to approach 
or draw away, the resulting picture is different from 
that obtained by a tracking camera. The reason 
for this lies in the difference of perspective in the 
two shots. With a “zoom” taking the place of a 
track, the camera remains in a fixed position and 
consequently the perspective of the scene remains 
unchanged irrespective of the apparent move. The 
relationship between the object and the foreground 
and background is unaltered. The only change is 
in the size of the object on the screen: it becomes 
bigger or smaller according to which way the zoom 
is made. With a tracking camera, this is not the 
case. Not only does the size of the subject change, 
but the perspective of the scene does also. Dramati¬ 
cally, or rather artistically, this difference between 
the two visual results is very important. 

With a tracking shot, the audience will feel that 
they are part of the scene, moving towards or away 
from the object as the camera does. This feeling 
of being “inside,” so-to-speak, is due to the chang¬ 
ing perspective, which resembles that which would 
be experienced in normal life as one moved in a 
similar manner. In a zoom shot, on the other hand, 
those in the audience remain outside of the scene, 
in the sense that they cannot feel themselves part 
of it. If the scene begins as a long shot and then 
narrows down to a closeup, the effect is not that 


the audience has gone into the scene and approached 
the subject, but rather that the audience has re¬ 
mained where it was and that a magnifying glass 
has been used to examine some detail in the long 
shot. The perspective in this case does not change, 
only the size of the object in relation to the screen 
size. However, there is sometimes an apparent 
perspective change with a zoom, especially with a 
zoom-in. It is most marked on the occasions when 
the scene is zoomed from a long shot to a closeup 
not of one object by itself, but to two or more stand¬ 
ing in different planes relative to one another. 
When this happens, it appears that the distance 
between the various objects is foreshortened, in 
other words, they seem closer together. 

This alteration in appearance is similar to the 
effect seen when very long focus lenses are used 
on cricket matches; though it is of, course, far less 
marked as the longest focal length of a normal 
zoom lens is still far less than that of the lenses 
used for such a purpose. The two sets of stumps 
seem to be very close to each other, and yet when 
the batsman runs from one set to the other, he 
resembles the Red Queen—he runs like mad and 
appears to get nowhere. This effect is, of course, 
due to the magnification of the image in relation 
to the position of the audience relative to the screen. 
A long shot on the screen seems to look normal 
to people seated in the usual viewing position, but 
when a section of the long shot is enlarged to the 
full -screen size—which is what happens in a room, 
or with very long focus lenses—then the usual view¬ 
ing position is no longer correct for the degree of 
magnification, and in order to restore the perspec¬ 
tive to normal the audience would need to move 
further away from the screen; the increased dis¬ 
tance being relative to the increased magnification. 
The illusion of perspective change is further in¬ 
creased by the elimination of the objects in the 

Continued on Page 46 




AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


29 



























FACT IS a crisp, sparkling negative must have top-quality prints. Otherwise, it can’t do its job, and 
your message falls flat on its face, wasting production time and money—station time, too, if your 
film’s on TV. Moral: Go Eastman all the way—negative and print-stock. And in the case of ques¬ 
tions—production, processing, projection—always get in touch with Eastman Technical Service. 






































For further information, please write or phone: Motion Picture Film Department, 
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, Rochester 4, N. Y. Or—for the purchase of film: 
W. J. German, Inc. Agents for the sale and distribution of Eastman Professional 
Film for Motion Pictures and TV, Fort Lee, N.J., Chicago, III., Hollywood, Calif. 






































CINEMATOGRAPHY IN SERVICE 



INSTALLATION OF modified T1A camera wing mount on bomb 
rack of F-86F aircraft. Mount developed by APCS personnel, 
encloses Bell & Howell Eyemo camera for photographing air- 
to-ground and ground-to-air combat action. 

THE T1A camera wing mount showing position of the Eyemo 
camera and the L-shaped channel through which the film 
travels to and from the 400-foot magazine in tandem position. 




Fitting The Camera To The Job 

Adapting cameras and related equipment to unique photographic 
assignments is all in the day’s work for cameramen of the APCS. 

By HERB A. LIGHTMAN 


Qne of the most stimulating challenges to the 
U.S. Air Photographic and Charting Service, 
in providing world-wide motion picture and still 
photographic coverage of Air Force activities, is 
the almost constant demand for development of 
special camera equipment and the adaptation of 
standard equipment to meet its highly individual¬ 
ized requirements. Sometimes this merely calls for 
an imaginative way of utilizing existing units with¬ 
out mechanical modification. In other cases it re¬ 
quires designing and construction of the original 
equipment to serve a unique purpose. In most situa¬ 
tions, however, a “yesterday” deadline adds zest 
to the whole procedure and calls into play a com¬ 
bination of “Yankee Ingenuity” and precise engi¬ 
neering skill. 

An account of a typical stop-the-presses assign¬ 
ment will serve to illustrate how APCS technicians 
swing immeditaely into action in adapting standard 
motion picture equipment to a highly specialized 


situation. Recently APCS headquarters at Orlando 
Air Force Base received a request for a camera 
crew to film a two-week Counter Insurgency semi¬ 
nar at the Air University at Maxwell Air Force 
Base, Alabama. Hal Albert, Asst. Deputy Chief 
of Staff-Photographic at Orlando immediately flew 
to the location to check out the situation. The as¬ 
signment called for filming forty-six 45-minute lec¬ 
tures during the seminar—as many as eight in one 
day. What made the situation more challenging 
was the fact filming had to be done without dis¬ 
tracting the audience’s attention from the continu¬ 
ity of the program itself. 

Albert decided the best way to accomplish this 
was to utilize four 1200-foot Super-Pro Auricon 
single-system sound cameras concealed in two 
draped booths on either side of the auditorium. He 
estimated that 170,000 feet of 16mm single-perfora¬ 
tion Tri-X Pan film in 1200 foot rolls would be 
needed. Locating this amount of such film stock 


32 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 









in a hurry was a project in itself. An urgent call 
was sent out to all APCS units which used the ma¬ 
terial as well as to Eastman Kodak Company. A 
barely sufficient amount of the stock was scraped 
together just in time to start the filming operation. 

It was planned to pick up the sound from the 
microphone on the speaker’s stand and to use the 
single-system sound track recorded on the camera 
film merely as a cue track. A separate “clean” 
track would be recorded simultaneously on mag¬ 
netic tape and used in the actual dubbing. The 
cameras were to operate in banks of two, record¬ 
ing from two different angles. Two cameras would 
shoot at a time, while the other two were reloaded 
for uninterrupted operation. As soon as a pair of 
cameras were rolling, the sound mixer would re¬ 
cord a “pip” to synchronize the picture films with 
the magnetic track. Near the end of a roll, when 
the other two cameras started up to provide over¬ 
lap, he would record another sync signal to key all 
five sound tracks together. 

In the actual filming operation, whenever occa¬ 
sional camera trouble developed, the plan had to 
be modified somewhat, but two cameras were kept 
rolling at all times. A wide bank of light units was 
set up along with adequate controls so that if one 
set of lights burned out another set could be switched 
on immediately. A two-way communication system 
was installed which enabled the director at a central 
location to maintain voice contact with the camera¬ 
men in the two camera booths and thus cue opera- 
ation of the cameras and the selection of subject 
matter. A detailed cue sheet was made for later 
reference by the editor so that he would know which 
cameras were shooting at what times. 

An additional problem arose out of the fact that 
the Seminar speakers used visual aids projected on 
a screen which did not show up clearly on the motion 
picture film. Still camermen were then assigned to 
stand by with cue sheets having notations indicating 
when a speaker would use a certain visual aid, what 
it was (slide, stereopticon, etc.), plus a brief de¬ 
scription of the subject matter, and indicating the 
length of time it would remain on the screen dur¬ 
ing the speech. Then, as soon as a particular lec¬ 
ture was over, the still men were given the visual 
aids. They rushed them to the base photographic 
laboratory and copied them in color slightly larger 
than 1-to-l. Later, at the Orlando laboratory, these 
color stills were mounted on an Oxberry optical 
printer and rephotographed on 16mm color film. 
This footage was then turned over to the editor 
who spliced it into the lecture footage as cutaways. 
Although the speakers were photographed in black- 
and-white and the visual aids in color (for greater 
intelligibility), the two films blended together well 
in the final release prints, which were made on color 
stock. 


One of APCS’s most functional developments of 
equipment for filming air-to-ground and air-to-air 
combat action resulted from modifying a T-l bomb 
rack to hold an Eyemo camera equipped with 400- 
foot magazine. Because of space limitations the 
magazine could not be directly affixed to the cam¬ 
era in the conventional manner but had to be 
mounted horizontally some distance behind it, with 
the film travel mechanism re-designed to feed the 
raw stock through an L-shaped track to the gate. 
The camera movement was driven by a 24-volt motor 
activated by the plane’s electrical system. Another 
24-volt motor operated the take-up of the magazine. 

When the original prototype of this wing-mount 
proved successful, several similar units were con¬ 
structed of ’/^-inch aluminum rolled to fit 10^/o-inch 
diameter dividing plates. A tail cone was affixed 
to the rear of the cylinder and two interchangeable 
nose cones were designed—one to accommodate a 
2-inch lens, the other a 6-inch lens. The resultant 
T-l A Camera Wing mount has a small access door 
on one side for changing magazines and another on 
the opposite side to permit inspection of the take-up 
motor. 

This compact camera housing is designed to fit 
any jet fighter which normally includes a bomb rack, 
and it mounts directly to the pylon of the aircraft. 

Continued on Page 48 



LOWERING CAMERA into the "Monster"—heavy metal protective hous¬ 
ing—in preparation for filming series of nuclear tests on Eniwetok 
Island. Housing enabled camera to record tests without danger to 
equipment. Unique built-in electronic device triggered camera into 
action following initial flash of bomb. 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


33 
















WHETHER IT IS an in-plant production or a film produced for a client by a commercial producer, 
the time required for processing of the film and making prints is an important factor to be con¬ 
sidered in the initial production planning. 


Planning—Key To Better, More 
Profitable Commercial Films 

Where thorough planning precedes actual start of 
production, the director and cinematographer will 
have a complete, thoroughly-detailed script enabl¬ 
ing shooting to proceed in an orderly and econom¬ 
ical manner. 

By FREDERICK FOSTER 


'y'HE profit ON an industrial or 
commercial film production of¬ 
ten depends on the economies that 
can be effected before shooting 
starts. Of paramount importance 
to anyone producing commercial 
films is the ability to carefully 
plan each production before it 
goes before the cameras. Non-the¬ 
atrical films, if they are to return 
a profit and at the same time suc¬ 
cessfully fill the need for which 
they were produced, should be 
carefully planned, step by step. 

By thoroughly visualizing a 
production in advance, the pattern 
of the finished film is established. 


At the same time, economies are 
effected through planning the 
shooting of the scenes in the short¬ 
est possible time and without need 
for retracing steps. 

The planning of a commercial 
or industrial film should begin 
with the very first conference be¬ 
tween producer and client. At this 
time there should be a clear state¬ 
ment and understanding of the 
problem to be considered. Certain 
basic decisions must be made be¬ 
fore even the most rudimentary 
script can be written, namely: the 
amount of money the client will 
allot for the production, and how 


much time will be available to 
produce the film. Some clients are 
prone to underestimate both of 
these factors with the result that 
serious problems often arise be¬ 
fore the production is completed. 

But once these two matters are 
settled the producer will know just 
how much production value he can 
include in his script and can ad¬ 
vise his writer accordingly—or if 
he writes the script, be able to pro¬ 
ceed accordingly. 

In order to establish a relation¬ 
ship between budget and produc¬ 
tion value, it is necessary to review 
the elements involved. The first 
factor to be considered is whether 
the picture is to be black-and-white 
or color. A color production is 
more effective than black-and- 
white but it is also more costly in 
terms of film stock and the in¬ 
creased amount of light necessary 
for interiors. 

The next factor that should be 
considered is the sound: whether 
the picture is to be lip-sync with 
dialogue, sound effects and music, 
or simply carry narration. Nar¬ 
rated sound with musical back¬ 
ground is usually easy to negoti¬ 
ate, since there are a number of 
film service laboratories that pro¬ 
vide complete music and recording 
service for the small film producer 
not having his own recording fa¬ 
cilities. Lip-sync sound, in which 
the speech of persons appearing in 
the picture is recorded simultane- 



CAREFULLY PLANNED, the production gets un¬ 
der way on time and proceeds smoothly and 
on schedule. (Roy Zeper Photo). 


34 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 













A.S.C. RECOMMENDATION NO. 11 

Society’s Research and Educational Committee proposes di¬ 
mensions for Safe Title Area for wide screen and anamorphic 
theatrical release prints with TV release potentials. 



0.738“ FROM THE GUIDED EDGE 



FIG. "3" 


0.738“ FROM THE GUIDED EDGE 


ously with the fuming is a more 
costly step because of the addi¬ 
tional equipment and personnel 
required to execute it. The advent 
of magnetic sound and more re¬ 
cently, the compact, transistorized 
and battery-operated portable re¬ 
corders, now makes it possible for 
16mm film producers to do their 
own recording, thereby modifying 
the cost of this phase of produc¬ 
tion. 

Whether a film will require 
many interior set-ups or can be 
staged mainly out-of-doors will 
have considerable influence on 
both the budget and the shooting 
schedule. Shooting indoors can be 
expensive for the producer who 
must rent generators and lighting 
equipment. The extra time in¬ 
volved in transporting equipment 
to locations, installing power lines 
and setting up lights amounts to a 
very substantial item. Where in¬ 
teriors are small or where indoor 
action can be staged indoors in 
small areas, portable, lightweight 
lighting equipment such as Color- 
Tran is ideal and adequate. It is 
compact and not too expensive to 
buy or operate, may be used for 
most all set lighting needs. 

The small producer today has 
the advantage of many sources 
where lighting, camera and grip 
equipment may be rented. (See 
Equipment Rental Directory in the 
December issue.) 

In setting up a shooting sched¬ 
ule for a picture it will be found 
advantageous to plan for earliest 
shooting those scenes which re¬ 
require the least staging—such as 
exteriors, natural location interi¬ 
ors, etc. In this way it is possible 
to get a substantial portion of the 
production “in the can” at an 
early date; and your crew will be 
kept busy while the elements of 
more complicated scenes are being 
assembled. 

One of the first steps necessary 
in planning and setting up the 
shooting schedule is to go through 
the script very carefully and list 
the locations, props and personnel 

Continued on Page 46 


A.S.C. RECOMMENDATION #11 

SAFE TITLE AREA FOR WIDE SCREEN (1.85:1) 
AND ANAMORPHIC (2.35:1) 
THEATRICAL RELEASE PRINTS 

1. SCOPE 

1.1 Data for marking camera ground 
glasses or title boards for safe title 
areas for theatrical pictures in 
1.85:1 and 2.35:1 aspect ratios in 
view of future display and reada¬ 
bility on TV channels are specified. 

1.2 Recommendation is based on pre¬ 
vious studies pertaining to TV 
release, outlined in ASC Recom¬ 
mendation #4, “Safe Action and 
Safe Title Areas for 35mm Films 
for TV Release’’, and especially 
ASC Recommendation #8, “Re¬ 
lease Methods Of Wide Screen 
(Flat) and Anamorphic (Squeezed) 
Theatrical Pictures on TV”. 


2. DIMENSIONS 

A. Wide Screen (Flat) Release Prints 

2.1 The main title and main credits 
on 1.85:1 theatrical prints should 
be within a width limit of 0.757" 
max. as per diagram “A”, having 
either straight or curved side lines. 

2.2 Since height of titles composed for 
1.85:1 theatrical aspect ratio is 
0.446" max. they will be safely re¬ 
produced within the 0.565" safe 
action area height in TV transmis¬ 
sion as pei* ASC Recommendations 
#4 and #8. 

2.3 The camera aperture for titles as 
per 2.1 shall be 0.868" by 0.631" 
(see ASC Rec. #9) with title cards 
and/or backgrounds covering this 
entire area to avoid wide-frame 
line prints and consequent black 
bars across top and bottom of home 
receivers as outlined in ASC Ree- 

Continued on Page 49 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


35 



























































PRODUCT REPORT 

i 

i .. —.. — — — 



THE MITCHELL Mark II Reflex camera with 400-foot inverted magazine dra¬ 
matically illustrates the flexibility of the camera’s design. 



THE MARK II Reflex complete with Universal matte box, follow-focus at¬ 
tachment, studio finder, sync motor and 1000-ft. magazine. 


The Mitchell Mark II Reflex 


This new, compact lightweight 35mm camera has all of the professionally 
required Mitchell features plus an advanced reflex finder system. 

By JOSEPH HENRY 


HEN MITCHELL CAMERA CORPORATION intro¬ 
duced its first 35mm reflex camera two years 
ago, it wisely limited production to a few cameras 
and placed them in the hands of professional cine¬ 
matographers qualified to render objective reports 
on the camera’s usefulness, performance, and on 
what it lacked, if anything, to make it a practical 
tool for the studio cinematographer. 

As a result of these unpublicized tests and of the 
critical reports and helpful suggestions that resulted, 
Mitchell completely re-engineered its original con¬ 
cept for the reflex and the results are embodied in 
the new Mitchell Mark II 35mm Studio Reflex Cam¬ 
era. 

The Mark II’s design concept, influenced by vet¬ 
eran directors of photography in the industry, called 
for a lightweight camera of advanced design having 
the capabilities of the BNC, NC, and Hi-speed 
Mitchells; a superior reflex viewfinder, and capabil¬ 
ity for hand-held shooting. More directly, the design 
concept, as viewed by Mitchell’s engineers, placed 
emphasis on the following salient features: 

A dual register-pin movement capable of speeds 
up to 128 frames per second. 

A dissolving shutter, variable while the camera is 


in operation. 

Provision for interchangeable camera motors of 
all types. 

Interchangeable magazines having film capacity 
up to 1000 feet that do not require separate take-up 
motors. 

Sturdy, accurate and reliable lens mounts. 

Ground glass interchangeability combined with 
special effects matte slot. 

Positive precision viewing system with variable 
magnification and built-in contrast viewing filters. 

Camera Showcased at the ASC 

Although the Mark II Reflex was given its initial 
public showing several months ago, its Hollywood 
premiere took place recently when it was demon¬ 
strated before members of the American Society of 
Cinematographers at the Society’s monthly meeting 
November 26th. 

The versatility of the camera, which incidentally 
marks a new trend in studio camera design, is ex¬ 
emplified in two photos above, which show the cam¬ 
era in streamlined trim for hand-held operation 
(left) and in full “battle dress” for conventional 
studio use (right). The salient feature here is the 



36 


AMERICAN,CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 






dual film magazine capability which provides for a 
compact, lightweight inverted magazine that mounts 
back and below the camera body and at the same 
time provides a rubber-cushioned indenture between 
the film chambers that serves as a shoulder-rest for 
the camera when operated hand-held. 

Other standout features noted during the A.S.C. 
demonstration will be described briefly: 

The Mark II’s full-aperture 128 f.p.s. movement 
is keyed so that it can be removed and replaced 
without having to be re-timed. 

The camera’s reflex focus tube viewfinder pro¬ 
duces a larger than full aperture field, and so bril¬ 
liant that the camera lens can be stopped down to a 
point below which a normal density negative ex¬ 
posure can be made—yet produce a bright viewing- 
image with which to compose. 

The shutter, of advanced design, employs a 
ground and polished stainless steel rotating mirror 
to complement the camera’s reflex viewing system. 
The camera shutter is of focal plane, variable disc 
design and a salient aim in its design was to pro¬ 
vide a shutter that would assure optimum exposure 
consistently over the entire film aperture. 

Matte slot in the ground glass holder convenient¬ 
ly provides for inserting a frame of film therein 
when required for match-dissolve work or other spe¬ 
cial effects made in the camera. Because of the cam¬ 
era’s reflex viewing feature, the matte can be viewed 
continuously when making such shots. Moreover, it 
makes possible panning and tilting of the camera to 
accurately locate the image or subject matter being 
filmed, greatly simplifying the photography of ef¬ 
fects which subsequently are to be combined optic¬ 
ally with other photography. 

The optics of the reflex viewfinder are a combina¬ 
tion of a Bausch & Lomb f/2.8 lens for variable 
magnification and a 65mm exit pupil eyepiece, 
which does not “black out” or fog over and covers 
a larger than full aperture field. 

Perhaps the most interesting innovation is the 
sync-pulse generator which is an integral part of the 
Mark II Reflex, enabling the camera to work com¬ 
patibly with the new miniaturized battery-operated 
tape recorders, such as Perfectone, Nagra, and the 
Stellavox in the production of synchronized sound 
films. 

The DC motors available for the Mark II are all 
governor-controlled. The Hi-Speed motor provides a 
range of frame-per-second speeds from 24 to 128. 
Also, it is possible, with this motor, to start shooting 
at normal camera speed, then increase the speed for 
startling effects. 

An optional accessory is the streamlined blimp 
designed to facilitate the utmost in camera conven¬ 
ience in sound stage use. Salient feature is provision 
for continuation of the camera’s reflex finder when 

Continued on Page 52 



MARK II dual pilot pin registered movement shown with gelatin filter 
holder inserted in the removable aperture plate (left). With a speed 
capability of up to 128 fps, this movement is ideal for animation and 
background plate photography. 



THE MARK II BUMP is lightweight, streamlined, and designed 
for unhampered operation of camera. It provides for use of 
the camera s through-the-lens reflex viewer and utilizes the 
BNC-fype captive cam studio finder. 



PICTURED HERE ARE all the various components, accessories, etc., by 
which the Mark II Reflex may be converted from a lightweight hand¬ 
held camera to a studio-type camera having all the facilities of a 
Mitchell BNC. The basic camera head is at lower right. 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


37 
















AMERICAN SOCIETY OF 

ROSTER • 



CINEMATOGRAPHERS 

JANUARY 1, 1963 


ACTIVE MEMBERS 

L. B. Abbott 
David Abel 
Lloyd Ahern 
Norman Alley 
Gert J. Andersen 
Howard A. Anderson, .1 r. 
Lucien Andriot 
Arthur Arling 
John Arnold 
Gordon Avil 
Lucien Ballard 
Charles E. Bell 
Manuel J. Berenguer 
Carl Berger 
Joseph Biroc 
Haskell Boggs 
Charles P. Boyle 
Elwood Bredell 
Norbert Brodine 
Robert J. Bronner 
Joseph Brun 
Robert Burks 
Jose Carlos Carbajal 
Ellis W. Carter 
S. C. Chuck 
Charles G. Clarke 
George T. Clemens 
Wilfrid M. Cline 
Russell D. Collings 
Edward Colman 
Olle Comstedt 
J. Burgi Contner 
Stanley Cortez 
Ray Cory 
Floyd D. Crosby 
Russell Cully 
William H. Daniels 
Mark H. Davis 
Faxon Dean 
Robert de Grasse 
Dale Deverman 
George E. Diskant 
Linwood G. Dunn 
Elmer G. Dyer 
Arthur Edeson 
A. Farciot Edouart 
Russell Ervin 
Maximilian Fabian 
Daniel L. Fapp 
Arthur Feindel 
Ray Fernstrom 
Frank Finger 
Edward Fitzgerald 
Frank R. Follette 
George J. Folsey 
J. Raymond Foster 
Ellsworth Fredricks 
Henry Freulich 
Karl Freund 
John P. Fulton 
Lee Garmes 
Frederick Gately 
Maury Gertsman 
Alfred L. Gilks 
Donald C. Glouner 


James B. Gordon 
Jack Greenhalgh 
Loyal Griggs 
Burnett Guffey 
Carl Guthrie 
Harry Hallenberger 
Ernest Haller 
Sol Halprin 
Ralph Hammeras 
Russell Harlan 
Charles Harten 
Morris Hartzband 
Charles W. Herbert 
John L. Herrmann 
Sid Hickox 
Gerald Hirschfeld 
Robert Hoag 
Winton C. Hoch 
David S. Horsley 
Eric Horvitch 
James Wong Howe 
Ed Hyland 
Ub Iwerks 
Wm. H. Jansen 
Torben Johnke 
Boris Kaufman 
W. Wallace Kelley 
Glenn Kershner 
Jess Kizis 
Benj. H. Kline 
Lloyd Knechtel 
H. F. Koenekamp 
Milton R. Krasner 
Charles B. Lang, Jr. 
Joseph W. LaShelle 
Ernest Laszlo 
Philip Lathrop 
Charles C. Lawton 
Sam Leavitt 
Paul K. Lerpae 
Lionel Lindon 
Leo Lippe 
Harold Lipstein 
Joe MacDonald 
Jack MacKenzie 
Glen MacWilliams 
Don Malkames 
Fred Mandl 
William Margulies 
J. Peverell Marley 
John J. Martin 
Harold J. Marzorati 
Rudolph Mate 
Ted McCord 
Wm. C. Mellor 
Ray Mercer 
Russell L. Metty 
Arthur C. Miller 
Virgil Miller 
Victor Milner 
Hal Mohr 
Nick Musuraca 
Harry C. Neumann 
Roy Overbaugh 
Louis Page 
Ted Pahle 
J. F. Painter 


Ernest Palmer 
Kenneth Peach 
Harry Perry 
Paul Perrv 
Frank Phillips 
R. W. Pittack 
Robert H. Planck 
Frank Planer 
Pietro Portalupi 
Frank Redman 
Ray Rennahan 
Gayne Reseller 
Irving Ries 
Irmin Roberts 
Charles Rosher 
Harold Rosson 
John L. Russell 
Joseph Ruttenberg 
Robert Sable 
Charles Salerno, Jr. 
David Savitt 
George Schneiderman 
Hoivard Schwartz 
James Seeley 
John Seitz 
Leon Shamroy 
Henry Sharp 
Douglas Shearer 
Lester Shorr 
William A. Sickner 
William V. Skall 
Clarence W. D. Slifer 
Harkness Smith 
Edward J. Snyder 
William E. Snyder 
William Spencer 
Harry Squire 
Ralph Staub 
William Steiner 
Alan Stensvold 
Clifford Stine 
Harold Stine 
George J. Stoetzel * 
William J. Storz 
Archie J. Stout 
Harry Stradling 
Walter Strenge 
Karl Struss 
Robert L. Surtees 
Philip Tannura 
Ellis Thackery 
Robert Tobey 
Leo Tover 
Thomas E. Tutwiler 
Charles Van Enger 
James C. Van Trees 
Zoli Vidor 
Paul C. Vogel 
Joseph Walker 
John F. Warren 
Gilbert Warrenton 
Harold E. Wellman 
Frederick E. West 
Albert Wetzel 
William F. Whitley 
William N. Williams 
Rex Wimpy 
Ralph Woolsey 
Lothrop Worth 
Frank C. Zucker 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Herbert Aller 
Simeon Aller 
Mark Armistead 
L. J. Baker 
Benj. Berg 
Edgar Bergen 
John R. Bishop 
Louis A. Bonn 
Wilford W. Bower 
Robert E. Burns 
Gifford S. Chamberlain 
L. M. Combs 
J. L. Courcier 
George Crane 
William A. Cushman 
Dr. C. R. Daily 
J. T. Dougherty 
John W. DuVall 
William Eglinton 
Ferdinand Eicli 
Walter L. Farley, Jr. 
Ted Fogelman 
Fred W. Gage 
Arthur E. Gavin 
William E. Gephart 
George H. Gibson 
Dennis F. Godfrey 
Henry Goldfarb 
Allan Haines 
Charles Handley 
Robert Hansard 
Wilton R. Holm 
G. Carleton Hunt 
Donald Hyndman 
Ray Johnson 
John J. Kowalak 
Wilson Leahy 
Sidney Lund 
Lewis Mansfield 
John H. Maynard 
O. W. Murray 
Kemp Niver 
Capt. Don Norwood 
Stacey O’Brien 
Val E. Osborne 
John Pistor 
Harry E. Pratt 
William J. Reddick 
Jay Reseller 
Robert Riley 
Loren Ryder 
Vaughn C. Shaner 
Norwood L. Simmons 
Sidney P. Solow 
John J. Swain 
Lou Vincent 
William J. Wade 
Jack Webb 
Ted Winchester 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

E. 0. Blackburn 
Edward P. Curtis 
Wm. J. German 
David MacDonald 
G. A. Mitchell 
Richard F. Walsh 


38 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 













Ansco sets America's standard 
of low contrast 16 mm color with... 



Anscochrome Professional Camera Film Type 242 


Designed especially for camera use when high quality release prints are important. 
The excellent color fidelity and low contrast of this camera film—plus its unique 
ability to record detail in shadows—make Anscochrome Type 242 first choice of 
many quality-conscious professionals. Film speed is 25 with 3200K tungsten lamps. 
For full details, ask your Ansco Man. 

When the NEED is SPEED Choose SUPER ANSCOCHROME 16mm Film 

Both Daylight and Tungsten Super Anscochrome have film speeds of 100. Produce 
accurate, pleasing color at lower light levels—often eliminating the need for special 
lighting equipment. 

ANSCO —America's first manufacturer of photographic materials . . . since 1842. 


Ansco 

Binghamton, N. Y. 


Anscochrome 
Type 21+2 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


39 










OPTICAL FX UNIT 

AND PRISMS 


FOR 16mm —35mm—TV CAMERAS 
LIVE TV, ANIMATION, 

MOTION PICTURES 


L jdk ?, F r o m t w o t o 

jM: jl seven images or 

combinations, more 
»,,/ than 27 variations in op¬ 
tical effects, montages, and 
distortions without expensive 
opticals. 


Images may be photographed in still motion or for 
ward and reverse rotation . 


Complete unit consists of a four sur 
face prism, mount, revolving housing 
and camera base assembly. 


the CR m ER(I • IDRRT inc. 

1145 BROADWAY at 40th ST. Phone: Plaza 7-6977 

NEW YORK 23. N. Y. Cable Address CAMERAMART 


Literature on request. 


FILMING “SAVAGE SAM’’ 

Continued from Page 23 


that usually obscures the landscape 
only a few miles away. 

An exterior film photographed 
in color on location, without the 
control of elements possible on the 
sound stage, always presents certain 
technical challenges, and “Savage 
Sam” was no exception. Shooting was 
begun early this past summer while 
the California hills were still lush green 
from recent rains. As filming progressed 
into autumn, the foliage turned brown 
and it was necessary to spray vast 
acreages of landscape with green water- 
soluble paint so that later scenes would 
match those shot previously. 

Another problem characteristic of ex¬ 
terior color filming arose out of the 
fact that the sun, “Nature’s Own Key- 
light,” changed its position progres¬ 
sively throughout the day. The company 
would begin shooting a sequence in 
morning with strong backlight prevail¬ 
ing. By mid-afternoon lighting in the 
area had changed to fiat front light. 
Matching the lighting on scenes, shot 

Continued on Page 42 



More Filmline Features: 
• Film chamber doors are completely removable for easy access to 
entire chamber (Not found in competitive models of similar class) 
. Processing section is stainless steel • Impingement dry box • 
Precision temperature controls with indicating pilot lights for cool¬ 
ing & heating . 316 Stainless steel pumps for developing & hypo 
solution - Water temperature regulator • Dual air squegee • Feed in 
take up elevators for continuous operation • Replenishment flow 
meters • Manual & automatic brake for film supply • Automatic 
electrical torque motor take-up • Variable drive with film speed 
tachometer . Precision Thermometer & footage counter. 


• DEVELOPS POSITIVE FILM AT 60 FPM 


MAJOR break thr ough 

IN SPRAY DEVELOPING 

• DEVELOPS NEGATIVE FILM AT 35 FPM 


Recent Filmline Installations: 

• N. A. S. A. Huntsville, Ala. 

• Reeves Sound, N. Y. C. 

• Thiokol Chemical Co. 

• WHYN-TV, KNDO-TV, WFMY-TV 

• Moral Rearmament 


Depf. AJ-63 


The S-60 is Filmline’s newest Spray Processor. 
It is a friction drive processor, guaranteed not 
to break or scratch film. Filmline’s exclusive 
overdrive film transport system is so accurate 
it makes this guarantee possible. What’s more 
film can be stalled 100% in spray chambers 
without altering footage. Absolute control of 
footage in each chamber insures sensitometric 
quality control and consistent development. 
And Filmline processors (unlike competitive 
makes) have lower film assemblies that are 
adjustable and remain captive in the position 
placed. Position of lower assemblies can be 
easily monitored and adjusted by indicator 
rods at the top of each chamber. 

The S-60 is the specific answer to every labo¬ 
ratories need for a Spray Processor — because 
it outperforms machines costing twice as 
much. Look into the Filmline S-60 — It Will 
Pay You. 

For the full story on the S-60 write today to: 


CORPORATION 

MILFORD, CONNECTICUT 


40 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 




























































Inspect every foot before it leaves your plant with the HFC High Speed Heavy 
Duty Inspection Projectors -- 16mm & 35mm models now available. 



NEW 

The projector is a converted front shutter 
Simplex with a two pin intermittent. 16mm 
or 35/32 film runs at a speed of 144 ft. 
per minute while 35mm film runs at a 
speed of 165 ft. per minute. 


3. A variac controls the light intensity. 

2. A 500 watt lamp is used for 16mm and 
a 1,000 watt for 35mm (a blower is 
used to cool the lamphouse). 

3. A 2i/ 2 inch projection lens is furnished 
with each unit. 

4. A start-stop lever controls the power to 
the lamp and motor. 

5. The magazine and take up core takes 
up to 3,000 ft. of film. 

6. Upper guide rollers are made to handle 
the film from either direction of the 
feed reel. 

7. A free wheeling take off flange is pro¬ 
vided in the magazine. 

8. A lamp near the takeup reel permits 
hand inspection of the film prior to 
takeup. 


NOUVEAU 

Le projecteur contient un obturateur Sim¬ 
plex anterieur transforme avec deux cla- 
vettes intermittent. Les films de 16mm ou 
35/32 tournent avec une vitesse de 144 
pieds a la minute, tandis que les films 
de 35mm tournent avec une vitesse de 165 
pieds a la minute. 

1. Le regulateur de voltage d’intensite 
d’eclairage. 

2. La lampe de 500 watt est necessaire 
pour les films de 16mm, et de 1000 
watt, pour les films de 35mm (un ven- 
tilateur est mise pour rafraichir la 
chambre de la lampe). 

3. L’objectif de 2 l / 2 est instale. 

4. La manette de mise en marche et d’arret 
controle en meme temps la lampe et le 
moteur. 

5. La boite de films avec noyau peut con- 
tenir 3000 pieds du films. 

6. La roue superieure est construite de 
maniere de recevoir le film dans les 
deux directions, nourrie par la bobine 
centrale. 

7. Une roue est instalee pour liberer 
rapidement le film de la boite. 

8. La lampe se trouve pres de la bobine 
recepteuse, et donne toute facilite pour 
inspecter le film a main dans le 
projecteur. 




HOLLYWOOD FILM COMPANY 



NUOVO 

Questi proiettori sono Simplex transform- 
ati, otturatore al fronte, meccanismo di 
scatto di due punte. La velocita di proie- 
zione in 16 o 35/32mm e di 144 piedi 
per minuto, e in 35mm, di 165 piedi per 
minuto. 

1. Controllo manuale della luminosita della 
lampada. 

2. Lampada di 500 watt per 16mm e di 
1000 watt per 35mm. 

3. Obbiettivo di proiezione di 2 y 2 ". 

4. Maniglia per controllo di motore e lam¬ 
pada di proiezione. 

5. La cassetta porta pellicola puo con- 
tenere 3000 piedi. 

6. I rulli superiori di guida sono construiti 
per operare con film provenente di ambi 
lati della bobina svolgitrice. 

7. Disco con montatura sporgente nel 
magazzino. 

8. Una lampadina illumina la bobina av- 
volgitrice, permettendo I’ispezione man¬ 
uale del film prima che si avvolga nel 
proiettore. 


NUEVO 

Esta maquina es un proyector simplex con- 
vertido, obturador al frente y movimiento 
intermitente a doble grifa. Para 16mm o 
35/32mm, la velocidad fija de proyeccion 
es de 144 pies por minuto, para 35mm es 
de 165 pies por minuto. 


1. Un reostato controla la intensidad de la 
lampara de proyeccion. 

2. Para 16mm se usa una lampara de 
500 watt, y una de 1000 watt para 
35mm (un chorro de aire ventila las 
lamparas en ambos casos). 

3. Cada unidad esta provista de un lente 
de proyeccion de 2 pulgadas y media. 

4. Una palanca de control opera el motor 
y la lampara simultaneamente. 

5. Capacidad de proyeccion: rollos de 
hasta 3000'. 

6. Los rodillos de guia superiores operan 
con la pelicula en ambas direcciones. 

7. La tapa de la bobina de carga es 
desenroscable. 

8. Una lampara ubicada junto a la bobina 
de toma permite la inspeccion manual 
de la pelicula antes que se rebobine en 
la bobina superior del proyector. 


REELS / CANS / CASES 

956 N. Seward, Hollywood 38, Calif., HO 2-3284 • 122 W. Kinzie, Chicago 10, III., 644-1940 • 524 W. 43rd St., N.Y. 36, N.Y., LO 3-1546 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 


41 















SMOOOOOTH 

That’s the word for MILLER FLUID 
ACTION TRIPOD HEADS! It’s because 
Miller Heads are true fluid heads . . . 
the load rides on the fluid and all 
tension adjustments take place within 
the fluid chambers, giving a velvety 
smoothness unmatched by any other 
tripod head. There is no slack, no 
bounce, no backlash, no jitter. They 
are available in two sizes: The Pro¬ 
fessional, for cameras of 25-35 lbs., 
and the Model “D” for cameras weigh¬ 
ing 12-14 lbs. 



MILLER MODEL “D” FLUID HEAD with 
Ball Leveling Top Miller Grooved Leg 


Tripod. 

“D” Head: .$150.00 

B/L Tripod: . 139.50 

Total: . 289.50 

MILLER PROFESSIONAL MODEL Fluid 
Head with Ball Leveling Top, Miller 
Grooved Leg Tripod. 

Ball Leveling Pro Head: .$299.50 

Tripod: . 154.50 

Total: . 454.00 



For the finest possible combination, 
get the new Miller Grooved Leg Tripod 
with Ball Leveling Top. These are the 
easiest and fastest leveling tops avail¬ 
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At your dealer, or order direct from 


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1619 NO. CHEROKEE 
HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIF. 

PHONE: HOLLYWOOD 7-8189 


FILMING “SAVAGE SAM” 

Continued from Page 40 

out of sequence, under such conditions, 
is an operation demanding great skill 
and patience. Cinematographer Cole¬ 
man avers that never before had he 
been confronted with so many back¬ 
lighted locations on a single color fea¬ 
ture. 

Judicious use of booster lights pre¬ 
served the feeling of “outdoors” with¬ 
out shadow areas going black. Like 
most Hollywood studio cinematog¬ 
raphers, Coleman prefers arc lamps to 
reflectors for booster or fill light when¬ 
ever available. Arcs are easier on 
actors' eyes, he says, and produce a 
stronger and more even light that gives 
truer pictorial quality than reflectors. 
Also, arcs do not depend upon sun¬ 
light for their effectiveness. In shooting 
exterior long shots Coleman sometimes 
mixes the two. using arcs to light the 
actors and light from the reflectors to 
fill in the background. 

“Savage Sam includes several se¬ 
quences in which the moving camera 
followed horsemen speaking dialogue 
as they rode. Since most of this action 
was backlighted by natural daylight, 
the problem was keeping the actors 
consistently illuminated with fill light 
during the shots without permitting 
noise from the power generators drown¬ 
ing out the dialogue. Reflectors mounted 
on the camera car proved unsatisfac¬ 
tory because they could not be held 
steady enough over rough terrain. 
Booster arcs, therefore, were the only 
answer. This posed the problem of 
how to power the lamps without using 
the noisy generators. Surprising 
enough the answer came from Disney¬ 
land. 

At this fabulous playground not far 
from Los Angeles special heavy-duty 
12-volt wet-cell batteries are used to 
operate monorail cars and miniature 
automobiles. It was found that six of 
these batteries in series would provide 
72 volts and 250 amps of electricity— 
sufficient to operate one arc lamp for 
a short period of time. Thus a double 
bank of the batteries was installed to 
activate the two arc lamps mounted on 
the camera car, making possible the 
three to four minutes of booster light 
necessary to film average running shot. 
The batteries were re-charged over¬ 
night to ready them for the next day’s 
shooting. 

Because most of the action in the 
picture encompassed vast areas of land¬ 


scape, and also because the cast fea¬ 
tured small children who were not 
permitted to work beyond a certain 
hour each day, most night sequences 
were photographed day-for-night. 

Coleman claims no special magic in 
this photographic technique. It’s simply 
careful application of the day-for-night 
shooting techniques which have be¬ 
come standard in the industry, he says. 
Coleman underexposes day-for-night 
scenes 17/2 L° 2 stops, depending upon 
the key of the natural light. When pho¬ 
tographing actors in day-for-night 
close shots, however, he overlights 
their faces by twice the normal amount 
so that, even though the background is 
underexposed, faces are clearly de¬ 
tailed. The key-light comes from one 
side in a fairly high contrast ratio to 
the fill light, and fill is carefully con¬ 
trolled to indicate shadow detail with¬ 
out washing it out. Coleman uses no 
blue filters in shooting such “night 
shots, hut works closely with the lab¬ 
oratory when the film is developed and 
printed to make sure that just the 
right amount of “cold" tone is added 
in the printing. 

The most challenging sequence of 
this type in the picture shows Indians 
around a campfire with the children 
they have kidnaped. The scenes in¬ 
cluding the fire had to be shot night- 
for-night to get a true fire effect, while 
those of the children were shot day- 
for-night. Here Coleman was careful 
to avoid sky backgrounds in these day- 
for-night scenes, and photographed the 
children against a hillside background. 
The resultant shots, filmed under com¬ 
pletely opposite conditions, intercut 
perfectly in the edited sequence. 

One of the most spectacular sequences 
in the film involves a stampede of 
more than 1,000 wild horses charging 
directly toward the cameras. The action 
had to be played very close to the 
cameras to capture the full impact of 
the thundering herd, even though cam¬ 
eras and often their operators have 
been known to be trampled during 
such shooting. Moreover, these cameras 
could not be operated by remote con¬ 
trol due to the necessity for following 
the action. In this case, skilled wran¬ 
glers controlled the animals so precisely 
that the sequence was filmed without 
mishap—although, after the take, lioof- 
prints were found only two inches 
from the tripod leg. Did Coleman re¬ 
main with the camera while all this 
was going on? “Of course,” he re¬ 
plies, matter-of-factly, “I had to keep 


42 


AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER, JANUARY, 1963 
















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Authorized Dealers 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Behrend Cine Corp. 

161 E. Grand, Ml 2-2281 
Zenith Cinema Service, Inc. 

3252 Foster, IR 8-2104 
DALLAS, TEXAS 
Producers Services, Inc. 

4519 Maple Ave. 

DAYTON, OHIO 
Salem Camera Co. 

335 Salem, BA 3-7206 
DENVER, COL. 

Western Cine Service, Inc. 

312 S. Pearl, SH 4-1017 
HIALEAH, FLA. 

Camera Equipment Co., Inc. 

51 E. 10th, TU 8-4064 
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 

Birns & Sawyer Cine Equipment 
6424 Santa Monica, HO 4-5166 
Camera Equipment Co., Inc. 

6510 Santa Monica, HO 9-5119 
S.O.S. Photo-Cine-Optics, Inc. 

6331 Hollywood, HO 7-9202 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Barnard’s, 4724 Broadway, 

Country Club Plaza, LO 1-7761 
Crick’s'Camera Shop 

6320 Brookside Plaza, HI 4-3390 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Century Camera Shops, Inc. 

26 S. 7th, FE 8-5857 
NEW YORK CITY 

Camera Equipment Co., Inc. 

315 W. 43rd, JU 6-1420 
Florman & Babb, Inc. 

68 W. 45th, MU 2-2928 
Pictronics Corporation 
236 E. 46th, YU 6-3713 
S.O.S. Photo-Cine-Optics, Inc. 

602 W. 52nd, PL 7-0440 
PHOENIX, ARIZ. 

Wilson Camera Sales Co. 

130 W. Adams, AL 4-0662 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Stanley Photo Service 

106 N. Broadway, CE 1-7840 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Brooks Cameras, Inc. 

45 Kearny, EX 2-1902 
SAN MATEO, CALIF. 

Foreman’s 

121 Fourth Ave., Dl 3-1869 
SOUTH AFRICA 
Photo Agencies Pty. Ltd. 

9 Kerk St., Johannesburg 
AUSTRALIA, Sydney 
Sixteen Millimetre 
Australia Pty. Ltd. 

49 Market, New South Wales 
BOLIVIA, La Paz 

Casa Kavlm 

Casilla 500, Calle Potusi 261-263 
BRAZIL, Rio de Janeiro 
Mesbla, S.A. 

Rua do Passeio 42/56 
BURMA, Rangoon 
G.K. Theatre Supply Co., Ltd. 

123 Sule Pagoda Road 
CANADA, Islington, Ontario 
Alex L. Clark, Ltd. 

3751 Bloor St., W. 

DENMARK, Copenhagen CHL 
Kinovox Electric Corp. 

Jenslousvej 2 
ENGLAND, London 
Delane Lea Processes, Ltd. 

12 Moor St., (W-l) 

Gordon Cameras, Ltd. 

45 Kensington High, (W-8) 
FRANCE, Paris 
Brockliss-Simplex S.A. 

6, Rue Guillaume Tell 
GERMANY, Hilden Dusseldorf 
Gerhard Johansen 
3 Lessingstrasse 
GREECE, Athens 
Christos Axarlis 

50 Stadium